Everything Kids

Is Mariah Carey's Son Too Old for a Pacifier? Should We Care?

What's the right age to take away a pacifier? Mariah Carey's 4-year-old son Moroccan is still using a paci, and it's really upsetting some of her fans.

Screen-Shot-2016-02-09-at-12.02.21-PM.png Mariah Carey/Instagram
I was old enough when my parents finally took my pacifier away that I actually remember it happening. They told me the trash collectors had strict instructions to come get it, and I distinctly remember trying to hide it from them in the pocket of one of my doll's dresses. I was probably around 3 or 4 at the time—right around the same age as Mariah Carey's son.

I'm glad they didn't have social media back when I was growing up. Because after the singer posted a cute pic of herself in bed with her 4-year-old twins Monroe and Moroccan on Instagram last week, many of her followers were quick to chime in with their own thoughts about the pacifier in Moroccan's mouth.

"I KNOW her son does NOT have a damn pacifier in his mouth," wrote one commenter. "He is too damn big smh, she oughta be ashamed."

"Take that thing out of his life already!" wrote another. "Stop being so lazy and not wanting to deal with weening him off...What the hell else do you have to do that's soooooooo important that child rearing doesn't fit in the schedule???"

Wow. Whatever happened to her child, her decision?

Moroccan isn't the first celeb kid to come under fire for using a pacifier past the American Academy of Pediatrics' recommended first year of life. Suri Cruise caused a stir back in 2011 when she was spotted with a binky one month before her 5th birthday. And last summer, David Beckham famously defended his daughter Harper, 4, in an Instagram post, writing: "Why do people feel they have the right to criticize a parent about their own children without having any facts??"

Good question.

While pacifiers have been shown to impede speech development, impact tooth and mouth structure, and serve as a risk factor for ear infections, they've also been shown to offer protection against Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. And isn't it every parent's right to decide what's best for their own family, anyway?

We think this commenter put it best: "How do you know it's not a ringpop?" they wrote. "Don't jump to conclusions & definitely do not tell someone how to parent THEIR own child. You outta be ashamed of yourself."

Right on!

Hollee Actman Becker is a freelance writer, blogger, and a mom. Check out her website holleeactmanbecker.com for more, and follow her on Twitter at @holleewoodworld.