A magical pumpkin display that certainly captivates a crowd.

By Rachel Mulcahy
September 09, 2019
Long Creative

How many pumpkins is too many pumpkins? We believe the more pumpkins, the better. If we had to guess, this West Virginia home would agree. The Kenova Pumpkin House is a well-known tourist destination in West Virginia that puts on a 3,000-carved-pumpkin display every year to celebrate the Halloween season.

Kenova is a quaint Southern town on the border of Ohio, Kentucky, and West Virginia. The man behind the extravagant display? Ric Griffith, the former Kenova mayor. He started this pumpkin display outside of the local drugstore with a humble four pumpkins, but when he moved to his current residence on Beech Street, the number of pumpkins grew. So did the crowds. Although 3,000 pumpkins might seem like a rather random number, Griffith chose it to represent each Kenova resident in this small West Virginia town.

Griffith doesn’t do the pumpkin carving alone; he has a lot of help from a small army of volunteers. Locals in the area join in on the Halloween spirit by gutting, cleaning, and carving the thousands of pumpkins. These jack-o’-lanterns are carved with funny sayings, silly faces, and silhouettes of prominent celebrities. One might wonder where you would even find space to display three thousand pumpkins—the answer is quite simple. The pumpkins line Griffith’s front porch, front lawn, and top the roof of his Victorian home.

This ultimate pumpkin creation has become the talk of the town, drawing in over 30,000 visitors each year for the past 20 years. Kenova hosts ‘C-K AutumnFest’ each October where the Pumpkin House serves as the main attraction, along with a number of fall festivities, including a great scarecrow hunt, bake-off, and a tractor show.

Although the Pumpkin House is truly captivating, the fame of Autumnfest has also built strong community ties and created everlasting family traditions. Gather your family and friends and carve out some time this October to visit the stunning Pumpkin House.

This article originally appeared on SouthernLiving.com.

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