“To see her get excited about the unicorn and have a day just about her was amazing.”

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Abigail Leggio Unicorn Wish
Credit: Little Tot’s Photography, Sarah Lawrence

In many ways, Abigail Leggio is just like every other three-year-old girl: she loves unicorns, playing princess, and all things magical. But the youngster from Clarksville, Tennessee, has also been battling brain cancer for the better part of a year.

Abigail's family recently teamed up with Make-A-Wish Middle Tennessee to help her live out her dream of being a magical princess and meet a unicorn.

On her wish day, Make-A-Wish gifted Abigail a princess dress and flower crown, and gave her brother Ty a prince outfit so he could also participate in the magic. Abigail got to ride in a horse-drawn carriage, meet two "unicorns," feed carrots to a unicorn, and get her picture taken with a unicorn. When Abigail's wish was complete, her mom Melissa said that the day was "more than she could've ever imagined!"

"It was a happy and sad moment. To see her get excited about the unicorn and have a day just about her was amazing," Melissa said. "To see everything that was planned to make her feel special was extraordinary. It was sad because she had to have cancer to have this special day."

Abigail was diagnosed with a brain tumor in October of 2020. In the past 10 months, she has undergone proton therapy, chemotherapy, and a 10-hour brain surgery to remove the largest and most aggressive tumor. While the remaining tumors haven't shrunk, they also haven't grown or spread, which is considered great news.

Abigail has undergone six rounds of chemotherapy at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt in Nashville.

"All the doctors and nurses at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt have been amazing," Melissa told Fox News. "Due to [COVID-19] restrictions, only one parent was allowed with Abigail during her treatment and all the nurses took such great care of her and also helped me through the ups and downs of watching your child go through cancer treatments. We will be forever grateful for everything they have done for us."

This story originally appeared on southernliving.com