Jabari, the baby giraffe born on the grounds of Disney's Animal Kingdom, can now be seen at the park.

By Talia Avakian
Ryan Donnell

Visitors heading to Disney’s Animal Kingdom can now see Jabari, the giraffe calf born in front of parkgoers in January.

Disney representatives announced that Jabari will be joining the theme park’s herd, meaning visitors will be able to see him up close on a Kilimanjaro Safari. The safaris, which are set in open-air vehicles, let visitors take guided tours of an "African savanna" and see live animals roaming the grounds of the Harambe Wildlife Reserve.

It was during a Kilimanjaro Safari that riders were able to see the precious moment Jabari's mother began to give birth.

The name Jabari, which means "brave one" in Swahili, was chosen for the calf thanks to his “bold, curious, and courageous” spirit. After spending the last few months with his mother, Mara, in a backstage habitat, Jabari already stands at seven-feet-tall and is ready to return to the safari attraction.

Take a look at his exciting debut below:

“True to his name, Jabari has quickly reached all of his key developmental milestones, so today he is returning to Kilimanjaro Safari savanna to officially join the rest of the giraffe herd,” representatives said in the announcement.

To celebrate the arrival of the calf, Disney’s Animal Kingdom will also be offering a variety of limited-time experiences and giraffe-themed goodies. New in-park offerings include cupcakes that feature a photo of Jabari and Mara at Tamu Tamu, giraffe-themed face painting sessions outside the safari entrance in Harambe, and photo sessions with special birth announcement props at the at the Harambe Bridge.

The Mombasa Marketplace will also have a range of giraffe souvenirs that include giraffe-themed Mickey ears and Tervis Tumblers, soapstone and wood carvings, and original artwork and prints by William Silvers and Larry Dotson.

The calf, who is getting ready to celebrate his two-month birthday, is a Masai giraffe.

His parents were chosen to breed through the Species Survival Plan, which is overseen by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums to ensure threatened and endangered species are bred responsibly to promote future generations. The Masai giraffe population has been dwindling in numbers due to factors such as poaching and habitat loss.

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