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How Much Does Cord Blood Banking Cost?

Get a breakdown of the costs of private cord blood banking, plus info on financial aid and advice on whether you should consider it for your family.

What can you expect to spend on cord blood banking?

money Caroline Hwang

There are around 20 companies in the United States offering public cord blood banking and 34 companies offering private (or family) cord blood banking. Public cord blood banking is completely free (collecting, testing, processing, and storing), but private cord blood banking costs between $1,400 and $2,300 for collecting, testing, and registering, plus between $95 and $125 per year for storing. Both public and private cord blood banks require moms to be tested for various infections (like hepatitis and HIV).

Why does private cord blood banking cost so much?

"This is a medical service that has to be done when your baby's cells arrive and you certainly want them to be handled by good equipment and good technicians," says Frances Verter, Ph.D., founder and director of Parent's Guide to Cord Blood Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to educating parents about cord blood donation and cord blood therapists. "It's just not going to be cheap." Although the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) states cord blood has been used to treat certain diseases successfully, there isn't strong evidence to support cord blood banking. If a family does choose to bank cord blood, the AAP recommends public cord blood banking (instead of private) to reduce costs.

Will health insurance cover it?

No, health insurance companies will not typically reimburse families for any of the costs of cord blood banking.

    Is other financial aid available?

    Yes, if you have any sick children who could benefit from umbilical cord blood. Public banks such as Carolinas Cord Bank at Duke University and private banks such as FamilyCord in Los Angeles offer programs in which the bank will assist with cord blood processing and storage if your baby has a biological sibling with certain diseases. FamilyCord will provide free cord blood storage for one year. See a list of banks with these programs at

      Who should consider banking their cord blood privately?

      Private cord blood banking can benefit those with a strong family history of certain diseases that harm the blood and immune system, such as leukemia and some cancers, sickle-cell anemia, and some metabolic disorders. Parents who already have a child (in a household with biological siblings) who is sick with one of these diseases have the greatest chance of finding a match with their baby's cord blood. Parents who have a family history of autism, Alzheimer's, and type 1 diabetes can benefit from cord blood. Although these diseases aren't currently treated with umbilical cord steam cells, researchers are exploring ways to treat them (and many more) with cord blood.

      What are the advantages and disadvantages of public cord blood banks?

      With public cord blood banks, there's a greater chance that your cord blood will be put to use because it could be given to any child or adult in need, says William T. Shearer, M.D., Ph.D., professor of Pediatrics and Immunology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Cord blood is donated and is put on a national registry, to be made available for any transplant patient. So if your child should need the cord blood later in life, there's no guarantee you would be able to get it back.

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