Will You Have a C-Section? New Study Breaks Down Your Chances by ZIP Code, Day of the Week

A huge new study on C-sections in the U.S. breaks down your chances of having the surgery based on your ZIP code, age, and even the day of the week you give birth.

What are the chances you'll have a C-section delivery? Amino, a site that matches patients with doctors, set out to answer that question by conducting the most comprehensive study on C-sections ever. The company reviewed insurance claims from 4.4 million deliveries and 3.5 million women over the past five years to conclude that about 37 percent of all deliveries in the U.S. are via C-section, while about ninety percent of women who had previous sections required another one.

The data was also drilled down by state: California, New Jersey, and Florida are among the states with the highest C-section rates (Florida topping the list with a 42.8 percent average), while Wisconsin, Utah, and Minnesota have some of the lowest rates (Wisconsin's 28 percent average was the lowest overall).

It's no surprise that age is highly correlated to the need for a Caesarean, as are health risk factors such as fibroids and obesity.

But researchers even looked at days of the week that women are most likely to have a C-section, with Monday and Friday leading the pack. Perhaps the study's most interesting finding is that C-section rates dip very low on Christmas Day—so what will happen this December, when Christmas falls on a Friday? (We're looking at you, Kim Kardashian!)

The folks at Amino sorted through this massive amount of data to create a few useful tools, including:

  • An interactive map that shows C-section rates by ZIP code in the U.S.
  • A state-by-state analysis of Caesarean delivery rates
  • A C-section predictor tool, which takes intoaccount factors like your age, where you live, if you've had previous C-sections, and risk factors like having a large baby, excessive bleeding, and gestational diabetes, in order tocalculate how likely you are to havea Caesarean birth. The tool then helps you find the right doctor based on your result

Melissa Willets is a writer/blogger and a mom. Follow her on Twitter (@Spitupnsuburbs), where she chronicles her love of exercising and drinking coffee, but never simultaneously.

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