Parents Perspective

The 5 Important Things I Realized While Trying to Fit in "Adult Time"

Joe DeProspero has two sons and a wife, and he is complimentary birth control for anyone who sits near him in a restaurant. His writing has been described as "outrageous," "painfully real," and "downright humiliating." Author of the dark comedy fiction novel "The Boy in the Wrinkled Shirt," Joe is also writing a parenting humor book. He posts twice monthly and his previous posts can be found here.  He currently lives in New Jersey and can be found on Facebook and on Twitter @JoeDeProspero.

The 5 Important Things I Realized While Trying to Fit in "Adult Time" 34919

As parents, we've all been there. Wearing an undersized Spiderman mask or princess tiara and throwing on the best character voice we can muster after an 11-hour work day, we silently count the minutes till bedtime when we can finally unwind and enjoy a moment of silence (with a few glasses of something to accentuate the silence). Then, it happens. You've reached the point in your day when it's so quiet, you can hear the hum of the air conditioning unit, a car honking its horn two distant blocks away. And you just breathe. Maybe you flip to your favorite TV show or set your fantasy football lineup (speaking for myself, personally). But after a while, something doesn't feel quite right. You find yourself instinctively changing the channel to Nick Jr., using words like "poop" and "silly goose." You come to the frightening conclusion that, like it or not, parenthood has invaded your psyche in every imaginable way. But then you realize something else; you realize that spending time with your kids yields more smiles than the time without them.

Here are some of the most significant reasons I've noticed hanging out with my kids is often more rewarding than "adult time."

Children ask innocent, sometimes insane questions.

While poker with the guys is fun, do any of your friends ever ask you deep, eyebrow-raising questions like, "What does 4:00 mean?" or "What do squirrels do when they're bored?" Doubtful. A child's mind is a cornucopia of wonder and curiosity. They want to know things, ALL the things. And they keep us on our toes. I can guarantee you I've laughed harder and longer at one of my son's questions than at any of my friends' fart jokes.

They make you feel smart, even if you're not.

I can list a great number of positive outcomes of me hanging out with friends, but "they make me feel smart" is not one of them. My kids, on the other hand, look to me like I'm the gatekeeper of all wisdom. They seek my guidance on everything from the creation of the ocean to the science behind fogged-up windows. While my sons will certainly become aware of my intellectual limitations once their math homework evolves beyond 10 + 4, it's a hell of a confidence booster to be looked upon as all-knowing, even when we're making half of it up.

When they eat ice cream and throw balls around, so do you.

Before I had kids, my days of devouring Ben and Jerry's and playing with balls were at least a decade behind me. Now? Almost every day, there's an opportunity to partake in one of the two. And really, who doesn't want those kinds of opportunities? That goes double for bouncy houses. I can't see one without "accidentally" tumbling into it.

Kids aren't jaded yet.

There are no bills, no wars, and no stress other than determining which pair of pajamas to wear to bed. Children haven't yet been exposed to the evils of life, and they see every day as an opportunity to cram in as much fun as possible. You can't say the same about most employed adults.

It awakens your imagination.

Perhaps the most important benefit of all is that there are truly no limits to your imagination when you're in the company of a child. Could that Batman action figure be riding your iPhone like a car to get to the kitchen to stop The Joker from stealing Batman's meatballs (which are played by marbles, by the way)? Sure, why not? It sparks your creativity and forces you to flex mental muscles you never knew you had. Try using personification with your drinking buddies and they'd likely cut off your supply of beer and dial up a psychiatrist.

Does anyone else have a perk of engaging with their children rather than adults that they'd like to share? If so, please add it in the comments section below or tweet me! And please check out more parenting articles I've written for the Huffington Post.

If you haven't seen it, check out my "Parental Guidance" video where I show you what it would look like if I behaved like my son! It's rather outrageous.