Parents Perspective

Kids of All Ages Want You to Read to Them

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Once your child can read by herself—especially if she has to read independently for 15 or 30 minutes each night for homework—you might figure she doesn't really need you to read aloud to her anymore. Maybe it's harder to find the time, or she seems too old for bedtime stories. However, kids ages 6 to 11 wish their parents read to them more often, according to a new study from Scholastic.

The study found that 54% of children ages under age 5 are read aloud to at home five to seven days a week, as compared to only 34% of kids ages 6 to 8 and 17% of kids ages 9 to 11. Nearly one in four parents stopped reading to their child entirely by the time she was 9. However, 86% of 6- to 8-year-olds and 84% of 9- to 11-year-olds (and even 80% of 12- to 14-year-olds) said they either liked or loved being read to.

I've got nothing against Ivy and Bean, but the truth is that sometimes the books at your child's reading level just aren't as interesting as ones that are a bit too hard for her to tackle on her own.

For the last few years, I have been reading to my daughter, now 10, while she eats breakfast. One reason I started this routine was just to distract her so she'd sit still and eat, but it has really helped her get her more excited about books. And I've been able to introduce her to titles she might not have chosen on her own. "Sometimes it's easier and more fun to listen to a book than to read it yourself," she told me today.

Ten minutes at a time, we read all three of The Land of Stories books, by Chris Colfer, for example, and she's recommended them to all her friends. The cover of E.B. White's The Trumpet of the Swan (one of my childhood favorites) looked boring to her, but I insisted we give it a try, and she loved it. Although she'd read Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by herself, she got scared when she started reading Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. It was less scary when I read it to her, and I'm hoping that she'll go back to finish the rest of the series on her own. Since she had enjoyed reading Sharon Draper's Out of My Mind on her own, we're now reading Stella by Starlight, the author's newest book about a North Carolina girl's encounter with the Ku Klux Klan in the 1930s. It's already sparked a lot of discussion.

Part of me wonders whether I'm robbing her of the opportunity to read these great books on her own, but maybe she'll go back and read them again someday. Right now, I feel lucky that I can share the experience of reading them with her.

Diane Debrovner is the deputy editor of Parents and the mother of two daughters.

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