Parents Perspective

Companies Need a Lesson on What Kids Really Want

Companies Need a Lesson on What Kids Really Want 34865
Even though I'm the mom of two girls, I find myself shopping in the "boys'" aisles an awful lot. And that's because it seems like most of the cooler toys and t-shirts (at least according to my girls) show up in that section. First it was Thomas the Tank Engine, then Star Wars, dinosaurs and robotics components.

It's disheartening in this day and age that companies still cling to these old-school beliefs that all girls like pink sparkly princesses, and all boys want dinosaurs and sports. That's what got Lands End in trouble earlier this month, as a mom started a campaign against the hearts-and-flowers motifs on girls shirts, for more realistic depictions of science. (I may just have to pick up one of the solar systems shirts for my science-loving youngest.) Lego finally decided to throw us a bone by offering girl scientist figures, after making loads of money off the pink-and-pretty Lego Friends, who seem to spend an awful lot of time on fashion, cuddly animals and talent shows. And Disney seems to have actually taken their latest acquisition, Star Wars, back to the stone ages, by stocking a single piece of Princess Leia merchandise—an "action" figure of her dressed in the revealing slave costume.

But I feel even worse for the boys who don't fit into the trucks-and-sports mode. Because it's a lot harder to make things from the girls' side of the aisle, where there's a plethora of pink and sparkly, work for a boy. On Lands End's Facebook announcement of their science shirts for girls you could see a whole slew of comments from moms of boys, requesting shirts with "non-threatening animals" and hearts and flowers for their not-so-stereotypical boys.

Of course, there are some ways to circumvent the marketing powers that be. Etsy and other internet retailers seem to be built on people making more gender-neutral crafts that kids that fall outside the stereotype might actually love.

Maybe we need to get the marketers to make it easier for all kids to find their passions—whether it's a girl who loves robots, or a boy who loves horses.

Want to know if your kid's destined to be a scientist, a chef, or President? Try our future career quiz.

Parenting Style: Positive Parenting

Image: Courtesy of Lego