The spread of the coronavirus is forcing working parents into telecommute situations across the country. If you’re struggling to stay productive while working from home, these tips from full-time work-from-home moms may help.

By Brooke Lea Foster
Updated March 30, 2020

If the thought of working from home with your child seems frightening, you aren't alone. Kids demand around-the-clock attention—and parenting while juggling conference calls, never-ending emails, and tight deadlines is no joke.

Unfortunately, the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19)—the respiratory illness that originated in Wuhan, China—will make this situation a reality for many parents nationwide. Employers are encouraging workers to telecommute in high-risk areas across the country. Some school systems have suspended classes indefinitely, and thousands of people with potential coronavirus exposure have been asked to self-quarantine for 14 days.

That means your family might be stuck at home for at least two weeks, with minimal exposure to the outside world, while you're attempting to keep up with your workload. But don't panic just yet! We spoke with moms and experts who have learned the best ways to navigate life at the intersection of working at home and Mom-ing. Here are their tips for staying productive while working from home.

Create a Schedule

It's important to line up your day carefully, with set "office" hours. How many hours do you hope to work that day? When will you return calls? What can you accomplish while your son or daughter is coloring in the next room? You'll get more done if you work smarter, not harder, says Christine Durst, a mom of two in Woodstock, Connecticut, and cofounder of ratracerebellion.com, a site that helps people find work-at-home jobs.

That said, one of the best benefits of working at home is flexibility, especially if you are your own boss. If your son or daughter is fussing during your office hours and it's a beautiful day, it's okay to push assignments aside and play outside. You can catch up on work later when your cutie has settled down.

If you have an employer, just be sure to have an agreement for how many hours per day you should log while telecommuting. Given the reason for working at home (the spread of coronavirus), some employers may understand the need for non-traditional schedules.

George Rudy/Shuttestock

Capitalize On Naptime

Take advantage of naptime for staying productive while working from home. Whether your kid sleeps for one hour or three, use this time to finish assignments that require your complete focus and concentration, says Erin O'Donnell, a mom of two and freelance writer and editor in Milwaukee, who often schedules work-related phone calls during her 20-month-old Jonas's naps.

If for some reason he isn't tired, they have quiet time instead: O'Donnell puts him in his crib with books and closes the door. "I can usually get in 20 minutes of work before he grows restless," she says. If Jonas wakes up while she's on a work call and begins crying, O'Donnell has trained herself to resist hanging up and rushing right in to check on him. "It hurts a little bit to listen to him," she says. "But it won't kill me —or him." Plus, she believes it's important for him to learn how to soothe himself.

Separate Mom and Business Roles

If you don't learn to keep your roles as mom and businesswoman separate, giving each your full concentration for a set amount of time, you'll never feel like you're doing either well. To separate mentally from the rest of the house, set up an office area, recommends Lauren Kohl, an attorney and mom of two in Newton, Massachusetts. She works out of a converted closet, a kid-free zone that helps her to detach from the rest of her house. If she can't see the dirty rompers in the hamper, she's less inclined to leave her desk to launder them, she says.

Plus, it helps you disengage from your job if you have a door to close. If you don't have an office, try making a list of everything you're going to do the next day, leave it in your work space, and walk away. "You're doing something to turn work off," says Durst, which helps with staying productive while working from home.

Keep Kids Entertained

Renee Belbeck, a work at home mom (WAHM) from Columbus, Ohio, and C.E.O. and founder of the National Association of W.O.M.E.N. (Women, Owners, Moms, Entrepreneurs, and Networkers), discovered a simple rule when her children were toddlers: "If I gave them a little quality time, I'd get two hours to work." She says the rule still holds true, even though her children are now 10 and 6.

Her other kid-centric tips: Set aside a few cool toys that your kids can play with, or arrange playdates or special movie viewings only during "Mommy's work time." If your children have something to look forward to, they'll be less likely to interrupt you. You can also try setting up an activity center in your home office so kids feel as if they have their own designated place to do projects while you catch up on e-mails.

Plan for Interruptions

Every WAHM has a similar horror story: She's on an important call, her toddler wants to watch Elmo or is suddenly starving, and her boss is left listening to a whining child and Mom's apologies instead of her bright ideas. Their advice? Hit the mute button during conference calls to avoid any unexpected yells of "Mommmeee!"in the background.

Give your child a nonverbal "Do not disturb" when you need quiet time. Perhaps you could wear a tiara when you're on the phone to signify that kids are not allowed to make noise or interrupt , unless there's an emergency. If you have an office door, tie a red ribbon on it when you're not to be bothered. This tactic is best for older kids; toddlers won't understand that they can't always have your undivided attention. If your toddler is fussing while you're on the phone, end the call and reschedule if you can.

Seek Extra Help If You Need It

You may think working at home means you can skip child care, but you'll have days when you need help—and that's okay (as long as you aren't under self-quarantine). When Jonas was about 6 months old, O'Donnell hired a responsible high-school student to watch him two or three hours two days a week. The teenager charged half of what an adult sitter or day care would, and it meant O'Donnell could concentrate on answering e-mails and returning phone calls.

Another way to get affordable child care: Pool your resources with several other working moms and hire one babysitter to watch all your children at the same time. Even without the sitter, you can get together with other WAHMs and let the kids play while you all work. "I found that if a child has a playdate, he or she is often amused long enough to allow you to do work that doesn't require extreme quiet," says freelance writer Melissa Dutton, of Columbus, Ohio, who also sometimes swapped child care for her two kids with another working mom a few hours a week. "I knew that she worked from home, too, so I offered to take her kid first, and it grew from there."

Your partner can also be a great source of support. When Samuelson's husband, a teacher, arrives home at 3:30 p.m., she relies on him to take over kid duty. He can ferry their two children to the park and get dinner ready, and Samuelson will emerge a few hours later feeling finished with her day's to-do list. If your partner gets home after dinner, ask him to oversee bedtime—you'll fit in at least an hour of work before the kids yell "Mom!" And once they do, you're there for the call, with no rush hour to race through.

Source: Parents Magazine
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Comments (1)

Anonymous
April 2, 2020
This article claims to give you tips to work from home while under QUARANTINE, but then suggests setting up play dates, crowd sourcing a pseudo daycare with other working moms, and hiring the teenager down the block. It seems very out of touch to assume we can and should do any of these things right now. It's irresponsible to tell parents to do these things that may put their families at risk during a global pandemic.