Speaking out in a heartfelt new essay this week, Steph Curry is calling on society to step up for women and push for gender equality.

By Jason Duaine Hahn
Updated: May 24, 2019

Curry addresses the pay gap, among other things, in the essay, which was published in The Players’ Tribune and titled “This Is Personal.”

“I’d be lying if I didn’t admit that the idea of women’s equality has become a little more personal for me, lately, and a little more real,” said Curry, who shares three children — daughters Riley, 6, Ryan, 3, and baby son, Canon — with wife Ayesha Curry. “I want our girls to grow up knowing that there are no boundaries that can be placed on their futures, period. I want them to grow up in a world where their gender does not feel like a rulebook for what they should think, or be, or do.”

The Golden State Warriors star said he hopes his daughters, specifically, can “grow up believing that they can dream big, and strive for careers where they’ll be treated fairly.” Right now, those dream careers are a little more broad — Riley, Curry said, wants to be “a basketball player cook” like both mom and dad.

Curry noted that the gender pay gap sees women get paid just 80 percent of what men do for the same job.

Curry addresses the pay gap, among other things, in the essay, which was published in The Players’ Tribune and titled “This Is Personal.”

“I’d be lying if I didn’t admit that the idea of women’s equality has become a little more personal for me, lately, and a little more real,” said Curry, who shares three children — daughters Riley, 6, Ryan, 3, and baby son, Canon — with wife Ayesha Curry. “I want our girls to grow up knowing that there are no boundaries that can be placed on their futures, period. I want them to grow up in a world where their gender does not feel like a rulebook for what they should think, or be, or do.”

The Golden State Warriors star said he hopes his daughters, specifically, can “grow up believing that they can dream big, and strive for careers where they’ll be treated fairly.” Right now, those dream careers are a little more broad — Riley, Curry said, wants to be “a basketball player cook” like both mom and dad.

Curry noted that the gender pay gap sees women get paid just 80 percent of what men do for the same job.

“So, for my whole life, really, I feel like I’ve been receiving this education on what it means to be a woman in America,” Curry wrote. “And one lesson from that education that’s really stood out to me is: to always stay listening to women, to always stay believing in women, and — when it comes to anyone’s expectations for women — to always stay challenging the idea of what’s right.”

In August, Curry hosted a basketball camp near Oakland that included 200 girls, and the NBA player said he was impressed by how engaged they were.

“At every boys camp that I’ve ever been to, you’ve always got some kids running around, acting wild. But this camp, these girls — they were about it. They were trying to absorb every single thing,” he wrote. “It was special, man.”

Considering the issues that women and girls face, Curry said he wants to teach his son, Canon, the values he has learned, in the hopes he can be part of the solution.

“What are the values, in this moment, to instill in a son?” Curry asked. “I think you teach him to always stay listening to women, to always stay believing in women, and — when it comes to anyone’s expectations for women — to always stay challenging the idea of what’s right.”

“And I think you let him know that, for his generation, to be a true supporter of women’s equality,” he continued, “it’s not enough anymore to be learning about it. You have to be doing it.”

This article originally appeared on People.com.

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