This is whose votes are absentee or mail-in. They deserve to be counted.

By Melissa Mills
November 06, 2020
Advertisement
Credit: Getty Images (2)

Pennsylvania mom Megan Walker, 30, gave birth to her second child at UPMC Magee-Womens Hospital in Pittsburgh on Monday, November 2—aka the day before Election Day—but that didn't stop her from voting in the 2020 election.

"I wanted to make it [in] time to go vote," Walker told Good Morning America. "He wasn't due for another two weeks, so I had him at 38 weeks. It was completely unexpected to give birth right before Election Day."

Walker asked UPMC staff to be released after her son, Bryson Drum, was born so she could get to the polls and vote in person. Luckily, that wasn't necessary: a ballot was delivered right to her hospital room.

On November 3, Pittsburgh Ballots for Patients, a non-partisan group founded in 2008 that helps patients in the Pittsburgh area complete medical or emergency absentee ballots for major elections, helped Walker to make sure her voice counted.

“It is so great to be able to do this and to be somebody’s hero for the day,” Paul O’Hanlon, founder of Pittsburgh Ballots for Patients, told Trib Live. “I’ve been in the hospital before, and I know how it feels to not be able to leave for whatever reason. We have some amazing volunteers to help these patients get a ballot.”

Mark Drum, Walker’s fiancé and Bryson’s dad, voted on Election Day and then came back to the hospital to be with his family. Drum was just happy that Walker didn't have to leave the hospital after having just given birth to vote—during a pandemic.

“It’s important to vote and be a part of the decision on who is running our country, on who is making major decisions for the U.S.,” Walker said. “We have the right to vote in this country, to decide who will make the rules and the tough decisions.”

If you're following the 2020 presidential race—I mean, who isn't?—as results trickle in, you've likely heard updates as states continue to count absentee and mail-in ballots that are, in fact, legal. You've also heard President Trump claim—without any evidence—that battleground states are counting "illegal ballots" and that they should "stop the count."

The truth is that the process of counting mail-in votes always takes time; it's not officially over on Election Day. This year's unprecedented number of mail-in ballots due to the pandemic is just causing things to take a little longer than usual.

Walker's vote is just one example of the many votes in key states like Pennsylvania that deserve to be counted.

Comments

Be the first to comment!