Everyone's having tough conversations with their loved ones this year, and SNL nailed what plenty of them have sounded like.

By Maressa Brown
December 07, 2020
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grandmother on cell phone video call with family
Credit: Getty Images

Whether you're dealing with parents who are chomping at the bit to see their grandchildren or you're frustrated that you haven't been able to see your grown-up kids since March, navigating holiday plans during a pandemic has been frustrating to say the least. Now, Saturday Night Live is doing what they do best and spoofing those tough convos everyone's having with their loved ones right now. In "The Christmas Conversation," three women—played by Chloe Fineman, Ego Nwodim, and Lauren Holt—FaceTime their moms and break the news that they're not coming home for the holidays.

Kate McKinnon, Punkie Johnson, and Heidi Gardner play the frustrated moms who react with passive-aggression, guilt bombs, or outright ripping into their children.

Johnson's character, in the midst of making gumbo, asks her daughter why she thinks she can't come home, noting, "I know you ain't got no man," and brings her husband, played by Kenan Thompson, onto the call to back her up. He tells Nwodim it's OK that she stay safe at home—until he realizes his wife would prefer he say it's not OK.

Meanwhile, Gardner's character passive-aggressively says it's OK, then threatens to throw her daughter's stocking in the fire and starts going through a box of giveaways. “Look at that. Your first track meet," she says, faux-admiring a trophy. "Remember how fast you were? How fast you were when you ran away from me, halfway across the country, to Chicago? Should I get rid of it? Great.”

And McKinnon’s character is a bit of a guilt-tripping drama queen, saying, "I never visited my own mother enough. I guess this is my punishment," and noting that if her daughter won't visit, she'll fly to her, promising to "quarantine in the plane bathroom." She then brings in her husband, played by Jason Bateman, for backup. “Daddy will wear his racquet ball goggles to keep the virus out of my eyes. How about that?" Bateman vows.

It's a rollicking, relatable glimpse at what all too many parent-child interactions are sounding like right now.

Here's hoping most people's fraught conversations are ending on as bright and loving a note as this sketch. After all, the best way to show someone you love them this holiday season is by keeping them safe and celebrating at home, as recommended by the CDC.