Need to learn to hang a shelf? Tie a tie? Shave? Rob Kenney has you covered on his YouTube channel.

By Kristi Pahr
May 21, 2020
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When 14-year-old Rob Kenney's father walked out Rob and his seven siblings, the Bellevue, Washington family was left to fend for themselves. Rob's father had custody of the eight children after a lengthy and divisive divorce, but according to a Shattered Magazine interview with Rob, his father didn't really want them. "He got custody of us, but he didn’t really want us," Rob told Shattered. "I think he was kind of done by that time."

On the day his father left, Rob remembers him saying, "'You know, I'm done having kids[.] You're going to have to figure out where these kids are going because otherwise, I'm putting them in foster homes." Rob then moved in with his 23-year-old brother and his new wife in a small single wide mobile home.

After experiencing such upheaval, Rob, now a dad himself, knew he needed to do something to help kids and teens growing up without a dad. So after years of putting it off, and quarantine taking away all his excuses to procrastinate, Rob started a YouTube channel where he teaches kids, teens, and adults, basic and practical life skills. The kinds of things you might ask your dad to teach you. He calls it "Practical 'Dadvice' for everyday tasks."

Need to know how to tie a tie? Rob's got you. Have a clogged up sink? Rob can show you how to fix it. Want to check your oil or change a tire? Rob can help.

Rob's channel, "Dad, How Do I...?" is not even two months old and has already garnered an impressive 2 million-plus views and 1.2 million subscribers.

Credit: Charles Gullung/Getty Images

Rob told Shattered, "I want it to be about everyday tasks, but I also would like to pass along some of the wisdom I’ve learned along the way to encourage people," Rob said. "I thought I was just going to be showing people how to do stuff, but it’s kind of resonating on a whole different level."

Since starting the channel, Rob has taken "Dad, How Do I..." to other social media sites, his Facebook and Instagram accounts boasting tens of thousands of followers each. This is the kind of wholesome content people are craving these days and we really can't get enough.

Comments (2)

Anonymous
May 28, 2020
here's something that would address and lower the need for this, not knocking it by any means. getting rid of bad judges in family courts. deleting the mantra "in the best interest of the child". 50/50 parenting across the board(unless proven otherwise with real evidence). a cessation of the belief that only women are good parents. transparency and accountability in child support transactions. better enforcement of visitation orders and real consequences for those who abuse or deny it.
Anonymous
May 22, 2020
Great idea! I'd like to ask this gentleman (or some other talented person) to extend his help to divorcees -- I find myself with a house with electronic doorbells playing annoying music instead of going ding-dong, with programmable ceiling vents which decide to no longer connect to the app which is supposed to direct them, with computers connected somehow and with no-longer working battery back-up units, with cordless phones that disconnect at any given (and inconvenient) opportunity, smart TV's that turn stupid at the first sign of a power bump -- and nobody to call to fix all of these oddities.