Child Development

Is your kid on track? Here's what you need to know about child development for the older kid, including appropriate behaviors, psychological development, social growth spurts, and emotional considerations.

Should Parents Be Concerned About Violent Play?

It may surprise you to learn that your child’s interest in imaginary violence can be normal, even healthy. Experts explain when you shouldn’t worry and when you should step in.
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Why I'm Teaching My Kid All About Failure

Success rarely comes without struggles. Parents columnist Jenny Mollen explains why she’s making it her priority to teach her kids how to keep trying no matter what.
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How to See Things From Your Kid's Point of View

When you find yourself desperately trying to talk some sense into your child as she whines, cries, or freaks out even more, try stepping into her shoes instead.
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How to Raise a Kid With Ambition

So you inherited your parents’ work ethic and want to pass on the same motivation to the next generation? Experts explain how you can teach it to your children.
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A Guide to Predicting Height for Kids Ages 3 to 10

In the years between toddler and tween, kids don't often experience growth spurts. Here's what to expect instead.
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When Do Boys Stop Growing?

The age when your son stops growing has a lot to do with when he starts puberty and whether or not he's a late bloomer. Experts explain what to expect, plus a few common height prediction methods doctors use.
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More Child Development

25 Manners Kids Should Know

Need an etiquette refresher? Helping your child master this list of good manners will get him noticed — for all the right reasons.
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When Do Girls Stop Growing?

The age when your daughter stops growing in height depends on what age she was when she got her first period. Experts explain what to expect, plus a few common height prediction methods doctors use.
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Childhood Amnesia: Here's Why Your Child Can't Remember Being a Baby

Most adults cannot remember anything before their third birthday. That's because of childhood amnesia. But experts explain why you should still focus on making memories with your young kids, even if you'll be the only one who remembers them.