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The AAP Says Medical Marijuana Is ONLY Okay For...

Medical marijuana
Legalizing marijuana across the U.S. is still an ongoing debate, and the American Academy of Pedatrics continues to oppose using it for medical (and recreational) reasons. However, the AAP is updating their policy and making a new exception: supporting marijuana only for "compassionate use in children with debilitating or life-limiting diseases."

No official studies have been published before on how marijuana (medical or recreational) affect children, but limited research on adults have shown that prolonged use can have negative affects on: memory, concentration, motor control, coordination, sound judgment, psychological health, and lung health.

But because research into the long-term pros and cons of marijuana use will take time, the AAP now recognizes that children with extreme cases of illness "may benefit from cannabinoids," or the chemicals in marijuana that can help suppress pain and nausea.

However, "while cannabinoids may have potential as a therapy for a number of medical conditions, dispensing marijuana raises concerns regarding purity, dosing and formulation, all of which are of heightened importance in children," says William P. Adelman, M.D., an author of the updated policy.

The AAP also included recommendations for protecting kids and teens who live in states that legalized marijuana, such as having federal and state governments focus more on the impact of marijuana on children, stricter rules on limiting marijuana access and marketing, and child-proof packaging.

Sherry Huang is a Features Editor for Parents.com who covers baby-related content. She loves collecting children's picture books and has an undeniable love for cookies of all kinds. Her spirit animal would be Beyoncé Pad Thai. Follow her on Twitter @sherendipitea

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Image: Medical marijuana via Shutterstock