Report: The Best Way to Treat Eczema in Kids Is...

For the roughly 10 percent of U.S. children who have been diagnosed with eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, a topical skin treatment is the best way to manage the chronic condition, a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics suggests.

While many parents have feared treating their children with topical steroid creams, the AAP reports that they are safe and can be the most effective way to improve quality of life for children who are suffering.

Treating atopic dermatitis is important because of the tremendous impact it has on the quality of life of children and their families. Managing the condition can include an action plan for families that includes recommendations on frequency of bathing, prescription medications, moisturizers and antihistamines.

An article published in The Wall Street Journal earlier this month posed the question, "Are You Bathing Your Baby Too Much?" While a number of factors can potentially lead to developing eczema, like genetics, environmental factors like how often your child is bathed can also play a role. The AAP currently recommends bathing your baby three times a week or less, however a study conducted by the market-research firm Mintel Group found that households reported using baby shampoos and bathing products closer to five times a week, according the WSJ.

Several studies as mentioned in Pediatrics have reported that eczema diagnoses among children are on the rise over the past several years, with 65 to 95 percent of eczema cases being diagnosed in children ages 1 to 5 years old.

Does your child have eczema? Read about this mom's experience with her son's severe eczema, and be sure to consult your healthcare provider for any questions you may have regarding your child's condition and treatment procedures.

Could your baby's rash be eczema? Here's how to spot this common skin irritation and treat it.

Photo of baby with eczema courtesy of Shutterstock.

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