Is Your Parenting Style Creating Couch Potatoes?

Every mother or father has their own parenting style—each with its own pros and cons. But some parents who choose hyper-parenting (defined as "a child-rearing style in which parents are intensely involved in managing, scheduling, and enriching all aspects of their children's lives") may be raising kids who sit around too much.

A new study from Queen's University in Ontario, has found a link between hyper-parents and their children being less physically active.

Children whose parents displayed extreme, attached parenting techniques (quite the opposite of free-range parenting!) "spent less time outdoors, played fewer after-school sports, and were less likely to bike or walk to school, friends' homes, parks and playgrounds than children with less-involved parents," reports The Wall Street Journal.

Researchers collected information from 724 parents with children between the ages of 7 and 12. Parents were given questionnaires to determine if their parenting style ranked within four categories of hyper-parenting: overprotective parents (aka. helicopter parents), overindulgent parents, overscheduled parents, and overly achievement-driven parents (aka. tiger moms). Approximately 40 percent of parents received high hyper-parenting scores, while only 6 percent had low scores.

Parents who received low to below-average hyper-parenting scores in all four categories had the most active kids. Although helicopter parenting was the most common style, it was not directly associated with physically active kids, but the other three styles were associated with fewer active kids. According to The Wall Street Journal, researchers concluded that "the difference between children in the low and high hyper-parenting groups was equivalent to about 20 physical-activity sessions a week."

Less active children only fuels the ongoing issue of childhood obesity, so the more that is known about a child's physical activity—or lack thereof—the better.

Caitlin St John is an Editorial Assistant for Parents.com who splits her time between New York City and her hometown on Long Island. She's a self-proclaimed foodie who loves dancing and anything to do with her baby nephew. Follow her on Twitter: @CAITYstjohn

The experiences children have during their first five years have a tremendous impact on the development of their brains, their health, and their future as adults.

Image: Active children via Shutterstock

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