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Are You and Your Kids Getting Flu Shots This Year?

Flu Vaccine
With flu season just around the corner, the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases held a press conference today urging everyone older than 6 months of age to get a vaccine this season.

While flu vaccination levels are up overall in the past few years, they're not at the levels health officials want them to be, the NFID reports. But the good news is that 70 percent of kids under age 5 received a flu vaccine in the 2013-2014 season. (The flu can cause serious complications even in kids and adults who are considered otherwise "healthy," according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)

"Influenza vaccines are safe, plentiful and we have more vaccine options than ever before," Dr. William Schaffner, past-president of NFID, said in a statement. "At least one is right for everyone."

This press conference comes after a CDC recommendation last month that healthy kids ages 2-8 receive the nasal spray vaccine (pictured above) if it's immediately available and there are no precautions for the specific child. (If it's not available, don't shop around—officials stress that getting any form of the vaccination is better than nothing.) It's also important for kids younger than 9 to get vaccinated because some might need a second dose four weeks later to have "optimal protection," the CDC stated in a press release.

Pregnant women are especially encouraged to get a vaccine because catching the flu "doubles the risk of fetal death, increases the risk of premature labor and increases the mother's risk of hospitalization," according to the NFID. And, the vaccine offers protection against flu to babies who are too young to get vaccinated.

In addition to the vaccination, it is still important to maintain proper hygiene and prevention practices like frequent hand washing, avoiding those who are sick, and staying home when you're sick.

Have you and your children gotten vaccinated yet? If you're on the fence about it, check out the four biggest flu myths and, if you're not sure what kind of vaccine is appropriate for you or your family, always remember to consult your healthcare provider with any questions.

What You Should Know About the Flu

Photo of child receiving flu vaccination courtesy of Shutterstock.