Blogger DIY Challenge: Hack the Changing Table!

Parents asked a group of crafty bloggers to make over a diapering station with just $50 and basic supplies from their home. Get inspired by their thrifty transformations. 

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The Challenge

Courtesy of IKEA

The Challenge

Each blogger started with a Gulliver changing table ($60, IKEA) and a $50 supply budget. 

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A Lego Command Center

Courtesy of Erin Spain

A Lego Command Center

Erin Spain, of her eponymous blog Erin Spain, reimagined the table as a designated Lego play space for her sons, ages 1, 5, and 8. To execute the transformation, Spain used the disassembled changing table parts to build a kid-sized table. She sawed the side supports in half for legs, used a shelf as the play table top, and cut the remaining supports to form a border for the table surface (shown here). 

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A Lego Command Center

Courtesy of Erin Spain

A Lego Command Center

Spain used wood glue and nails that she had on-hand to reassemble the pieces and then patched the pre-drilled holes with wood filler. To finish, she primed and painted the whole thing white, using affordable sample paint pots ($3). After drying, she added painted navy accents ($3) to the legs and four hooks ($6) to the ends of the table (one per corner) to hang buckets ($4). Spain also cut LEGO bases ($30) that she purchased on eBay with a utility knife to cover the play surface. Now her two older boys have a place to play, and Spain is much less likely to step on a Lego brick again. 

Total spent: $46

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A Pint-Size Hideout

Courtesy of Minhee Cho 

A Pint-Size Hideout

Minhee Cho, the creative director of Hellobee, turned the table into a cozy play tent for her 6-year-old son. Cho crafted a V-shaped cardboard "roof" that sits over the top of the table (shown here), and removed the bottom two shelves to make a play space below. 

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A Pint-Size Hideout

Courtesy of Minhee Cho

A Pint-Size Hideout

Then, she covered the frame with 3 1/2 yards of fabric ($28), which she seamed together with fabric tape ($4) and trimmed with pom-pom ball fringe ($13). Once the fort was complete, Cho decorated the hideout with accessories from her home.

Total spent: $45

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An Organized Art Cart

Courtesy of Jennifer Stagg

An Organized Art Cart

With minimal but impactful changes, Jennifer Stagg, of With Heart, turned the table into a mobile art-supply cart for her craft-loving 3-year-old daughter, complete with a DIY washi tape design.

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An Organized Art Cart

Courtesy of Jennifer Stagg

An Organized Art Cart

Stagg saved on supplies by priming and painting the assembled table with paint leftover from another project. Once dry, she added casters ($40 for four) and added brass handles ($1.50) and stick-on hooks ($4) for added functionality. She created a washi-tape ($3) design on the shelves for graphic punch.

Total spent: $48.50

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A Stacked Storage Unit

Courtesy of Courtney Barbe

A Stacked Storage Unit

Courtney Barbe, an editor for Project Nursery and mom of a 4-year-old girl and a 1-year-old boy, flexed her carpenter's muscles to create a seriously sophisticated storage unit for her home office. Barbe built the base (by hand!) to match the table's dimensions, using $24 worth of plywood, boards ($2), edging tape ($6), and nails and screws ($1). 

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A Stacked Storage Unit

Courtesy of Courtney Barbe 

A Stacked Storage Unit

To finish, she painted everything with satin-finish white paint ($4), and she affixed the cabinet doors with hinges ($8) and added pulls ($5). Finally, she secured the table on top to create a two-tiered cabinet.

Total spent: $50        

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A Pretend-Play Work Table

Courtesy of Chad Carter

A Pretend-Play Work Table

Chad Carter, of Dads Who Diaper, used his grown-up tools to make this mini workbench for his toddler. First, Carter removed the top shelf and its shelf rails. Next, he saw off a portion of each side rail (shown here) to make room for a pegboard ($8), which he cut to size and spray-painted fire-engine red ($4). 

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A Pretend-Play Work Table

Courtesy of Chad Carter

A Pretend-Play Work Table

He sawed down the leftover pieces to create the frame for the pegboard, and attached them to the leftover top shelf with heavy-duty glue and screws ($12), which he then attached to the table. He finished the bench off with a roll of craft paper ($3.50), baskets from a dollar store ($3), and his son's toy tools.

Total spent: $30.50

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A Green Thumb's Potting Bench

Courtesy of Dinah Wulf 

A Green Thumb's Potting Bench

Mother of a 5-year-old and a 2-month-old, Dinah Wulf, of DIY Inspired, imagined a gardening table for her mild Southern California climate. At a secondhand store run by her local Habitat for Humanity, Wulf spent $28 on a towel rack, shelf brackets, and cabinet doors. She attached the doors to the changing table with homemade wooden braces made from lumber ($5) and screws ($2).

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A Green Thumb's Potting Bench

Courtesy of Dinah Wulf

A Green Thumb's Potting Bench

To finish it off, Wulf mounted the salvaged towel rack on one side and bought hooks (from a hardware store for $5) for the other side to hang her gardening tools.

Total spent: $40