High-Fructose Corn Syrup Name Change Denied

The request came on the heels of a national advertising campaign promoting the syrup as a natural ingredient made from corn.

But in a letter, Michael M. Landa, director of the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition at the F.D.A., denied the petition, saying that the term "sugar" is used only for food "that is solid, dried and crystallized."

"HFCS is an aqueous solution sweetener derived from corn after enzymatic hydrolysis of cornstarch, followed by enzymatic conversion of glucose (dextrose) to fructose," the letter stated. "Thus, the use of the term 'sugar' to describe HFCS, a product that is a syrup, would not accurately identify or describe the basic nature of the food or its characterizing properties."

In addition, the F.D.A. concluded that the term "corn sugar" has been used to describe the sweetener dextrose and therefore should not be used to describe high-fructose corn syrup. The agency also said the term "corn sugar" could pose a risk to consumers who have been advised to avoid fructose because of a hereditary fructose intolerance or fructose malabsorption.

High-fructose corn syrup is found in processed foods including pasta sauces, sodas, cereals, breads, and more.

Image: Syrup, via Shutterstock.

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