Best Online Therapy for Kids

With loads of flexibility, Talkspace offers the best online therapy for kids.

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Done right, online therapy for kids and teens can be just as effective as in-person therapy. Many prefer it for its accessibility, easy scheduling, and cost-effectiveness. However, not every online therapy provider is able to address the unique needs of minors, which can make finding the right service difficult.

Finding the optimal online therapy service for your child requires careful consideration of cost, services offered, methods, availability, and more. To help make the vetting process less daunting, we analyzed the top 55 online therapy companies to find the best services for teenagers and kids for a variety of scenarios. Here are the ones we recommend.

Best Online Therapy for Teenagers and Kids in 2023

Best Overall: Talkspace

Talkspace

Talkspace

Key Specs

  • Price: $69 to $129 weekly
  • Insurance accepted: Yes
  • Communication options: Text messaging, audio messaging, live chat, phone, video chat
  • Age: 13 and up

Why We Chose It

Talkspace has licensed therapists in all 50 states who can communicate with your teen in whatever way works: Text messaging, audio messaging, live chat, live video chat, and live audio chat are all options. As a bonus for parents, Talkspace is in-network for many insurance providers.

Pros & Cons

Pros
  • Multiple ways to communicate

  • Nationwide network of licensed therapists

  • Offers medication management 

Cons
  • 30-minute live sessions

  • Asynchronous messages can be impersonal

  • Not all membership plans include live sessions

Overview

Talkspace clears the runway so your kid can connect with a licensed therapist quickly. Around since 2012, Talkspace started offering online therapy for teens in 2019. In addition to online therapy for teenagers, Talkspace offers individual and couples therapy, as well as psychiatry services, to people in all 50 states. Monthly membership options include unlimited asynchronous messaging, four 30-minute live sessions, or a combination of the two.

Talkspace is tech-forward, which has benefits for users. Our survey results indicated that people find the Talkspace website easier to use than most other online therapy companies, with 82% rating it easy or very easy. After a brief assessment, Talkspace matches you with a selection of providers licensed in your state so you can quickly start therapy. The scheduled online therapy sessions take place online or via the Talkspace app. The session format is flexible, with choices for live video, audio, or messaging—which works well for teens who have grown up largely online. 

While some reviewers noted that messaging sometimes felt impersonal and the 30-minute session length felt too short to address substantial issues, most were very satisfied for the most part. In fact, 90% rated Talkspace as good, very good, or excellent overall, and 82% would recommend Talkspace to a friend. A whopping 97% said Talkspace was a little better, better, or much better than therapy services they’d used in the past. Talkspace stands out for overwhelming user satisfaction and flexibility.

Best for Young Kids: Little Otter

Little Otter

Little Otter

Key Specs

  • Price: $200 per session
  • Insurance accepted: Yes 
  • Communication options: Video, phone
  • Age: 0 to 14

Why We Chose It

Little Otter is tailor-made to support the mental health of very young kids, who are often left out of other online therapy offerings. Evidence-based therapy for young kids includes substantial parental involvement. That’s why we liked that Little Otter offers child therapy and psychiatry along with parent coaching and support. With nice extras like its slick app and sweet shop, Little Otter feels like the future of online therapy for kids.  

Pros & Cons

Pros
  • Dedicated to children ages 0 to 14

  • Features parent training and support

  • Receive a personalized report with tips

Cons
  • Only accepts Kaiser Permanente insurance

  • No marriage or couples counseling without kids

  • Available in select states 

Overview

Little Otter sets itself apart with a focus on teletherapy for kids 0 to 14. Launched in May 2021, Little Otter offers child therapy, parent training and support, couples therapy, and psychiatric services in 11 states and Washington, D.C. Its therapists are able to address many common early childhood issues, including trauma and OCD, but they don’t assess for autism. The company’s approach feels modern, complete with an app and a shop featuring materials from Little Renegade, which it acquired in September 2022. While Little Otter is out of network for all but Kaiser Permanente members, it says its services are HSA/FSA eligible, and there are discounts for buying session bundles. 

To begin working with Little Otter, you complete a short quiz to receive a custom report with insights and tips to help your family right away. From there, you can book a welcome session as well as regular sessions. If your needs are urgent, this sequence might feel like too much preamble, but 75% of the people we surveyed rated their overall experience as good, very good, or excellent. Of people who had seen a therapist in the past, 67% said teletherapy with Little Otter was as helpful or more helpful than their past experiences. With a full suite of services made for the youngest of kids, Little Otter stands out from other online therapy providers. 

Best for Teens: Teen Counseling

Teen Counseling

 Teen Counseling

Key Specs

  • Price: $60 to $90 weekly
  • Insurance accepted: No
  • Communication options: Messaging, live chat, phone, video
  • Age: 13 to 19

Why We Chose It

Teen Counseling matches kids ages 13 to 19 with licensed therapists via its vast national network. It’s easy to get started and relatively inexpensive, even without insurance. Plus, the flexible communication options, including messaging, live chat, phone, and video therapy, mean teens can get support whenever and wherever they are. 

Pros & Cons

Pros
  • Quick signup

  • Relatively inexpensive

  • Over 16,000 therapists specializing in teen issues

Cons
  • Short, 30-minute sessions

  • Doesn’t accept insurance

  • You can’t pick your therapist

Overview

Teen Counseling is designed to meet teens exactly where they are, by connecting them with licensed therapists through messaging, live chat, phone, and video counseling. After answering a few questions, Teen Counseling (which is part of online therapy giant BetterHelp) matches youths with a provider via its vast nationwide therapy network. The website says its therapists can help teens with coping skills, anxiety, stress, self-esteem, depression, bullying, anger, eating disorders, or any other mental health challenges. Parents can get support too. However, teens and parents have separate therapy rooms, and what each shares is private, except for standard exceptions for safety concerns. 

While you can’t pick your therapist, the users we surveyed were satisfied with the diversity of the therapists and their overall therapy experience. 

Because the platform is geared toward providing supportive counseling and teaching coping skills during 30-minute sessions, it’s not appropriate if your teen is in a mental health crisis. Teen Counseling also doesn’t accept insurance, but its $60 to $90 per week out-of-pocket cost is lower than many other online therapy services we researched.

Even with these caveats, the users we surveyed felt great about their experiences with Teen Counseling: 85% said they had a positive overall experience. This could be, in part, because the large network of over 16,000 therapists reflects the needs and identities of teens across the country. Seventy-six percent rated the diversity of the therapists as good, very good, or excellent. Some people found the platform a little glitchy, but 79% still said they would recommend Teen Counseling to someone like them. 

Best Family Therapy: Thriveworks

Thriveworks

Key Specs

  • Price: $99 per session 
  • Insurance accepted: Yes
  • Communication options: Video, phone, in-person
  • Age: Children, teens, and adults

Why We Chose It

Thriveworks offers online therapy for the whole family in 43 states. The complicated payment structure can be a pain, but it does take insurance and offers good value for your money.

Pros & Cons

Pros
  • Accepts insurance 

  • Medication management 

  • Has in-person therapy in some locations too

Cons
  • You pay for sessions on top of membership

  • Not available in NE, NY, ND, SD, VT, WV, and WY

  • Age served varies based on your location

Overview  

Thriveworks is one of the grandfathers of online therapy. Founded back in 2008, it has great availability for most of the nation, offering services in 43 states (not available in Nebraska, New York, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wyoming).

In addition to family therapy, Thriveworks provides individual counseling, couples counseling, and psychiatry. Depending on the location, children and teens may be treated as well to meet the needs of the whole family. That could be why the people we surveyed had overwhelmingly positive feelings about Thriveworks. Overall, 90% of users rated their experience with Thriveworks as good, very good, or excellent. Likewise, 98% said the psychiatry services were good, very good, or excellent.

Some people were frustrated with the complicated payment structure, which includes a membership fee on top of session fees. But the out-of-pocket fees themselves, which could be reduced with insurance, are reasonable compared to other online therapy providers, and 78% of those surveyed said Thriveworks had good value for money.

Best for BIPOC Children: LiveHealth Online

Live Health Online Logo

Live Health Online

Key Specs

  • Price: $80 to $95 per session
  • Insurance accepted: Yes
  • Communication options: Video
  • Age: 10 and up

Why We Chose It

With LiveHealth Online, you can get quick access to quality online therapy from a diverse range of therapists. People ages 10 and up can schedule 45-minute individual therapy sessions that take place via video conference on your computer or on an app. Some insurance is accepted, and it has a high overall customer satisfaction rating with the users we surveyed.

Pros & Cons

Pros
  • Diverse group of therapists

  • Offers therapy to ages 10 and up

  • Has medical care, allergy care, and psychiatry too

Cons
  • Doesn’t serve young kids

  • In-network for a limited number of insurance providers

  • Only has live video sessions

Overview

LiveHealth Online is a straightforward, reliable place to get online mental health care and other telemedicine for people ages 10 and up in all 50 states. Most importantly for BIPOC kids, LiveHealth Online’s providers come from a range of backgrounds, so diverse youth can choose a provider who looks like them. It's been in business since 2013, and, in addition to online therapy and psychiatry for kids and adults, LiveHealth Online also provides general online medical care.

LiveHealth’s online therapy is more affordable than most other services we reviewed. The company is also in-network for some insurance providers, which may reduce your cost even further. To get started, you need to sign up, select a therapist, and then pick a time to meet. LiveHealth Online promises you’ll be able to get seen within four days. The 45-minute video sessions take place on your computer or on the Live Health app.

There are many factors that contribute to effective mental health care for BIPOC youth. It can be particularly powerful for BIPOC people to work with therapists who reflect their ethnic and racial background, according to the American Psychological Association (APA). That’s why it stood out that 87% of the people we surveyed felt positively about LiveHealth Online’s diversity. A fifth of them reported that they had sought out LiveHealth Online, in part, because they wanted to work with a therapist with a similar identity or cultural background. People were satisfied with the service overall as well, with 87% saying they were likely to recommend to a friend or someone like them, and 89% said it is a little better, better, or much better than other services they’ve used in the past.

Best for LGBTQIA+ Children: Kip Therapy

Kip Therapy

Key Specs

  • Price: $65 to $250 per session
  • Insurance accepted: No
  • Communication options: Video, phone
  • Age: 13 and up

Why We Chose It

Kip provides identity-affirming mental health care for LGBTQIA+ children, and the people we surveyed were largely happy with their online therapy experience. However, Kip is only available in New York and does not accept insurance.

Pros & Cons

Pros
  • Has a gender and sexuality team

  • Can search for therapists by gender identity and sexual orientation

  • Offers individual, group, family, and couples therapy

Cons
  • Only available for residents of NY

  • Does not accept insurance

  • No messaging option

Overview

Founded in 2013, Kip Therapy has made a name for itself in the online therapy world for its careful attention to issues relevant to LGBTQIA+ people. Kip has a gender and sexuality team, and clients can search for therapists by gender identity and sexual orientation who are able to provide individual, couple, family, and group therapy to adolescents and adults. These efforts reflect best practices from the APA's Guidelines for Psychological Practice with Sexual Minority Persons, which include recommendations to distinguish issues of sexual orientation from those of gender identity and expression and to recognize the influence that sexual minority status can have on mental health. 

Unfortunately, the company only serves clients in New York State, and does not accept insurance. However, tiered pricing is available; session prices start at $65 and increase up to $250 for more experienced therapists and more specialized therapy. For those who can afford its services, Kip’s approach appears to work. Seventy-three percent of the people we surveyed had a positive overall experience with Kip, and eighty-three percent said it compared favorably to therapy they’d tried in the past. For New York-based LGBTQIA+ adolescents, Kip is a welcoming, affirming online therapy option.

Best Directory: Good Therapy

Good Therapy logo

Good Therapy 

Key Specs

  • Price: Directory is free; therapy charges depend on provider
  • Insurance accepted: Depends on therapist
  • Communication options: Depends on therapist
  • Age: Depends on therapist

Why We Chose It

GoodTherapy has a nationwide network of licensed therapists and an easy-to-use database to help you find the right online therapist for your child. 

Pros & Cons

Pros
  • Serves all 50 states

  • Therapists are licensed

  • Can search for specialization with kids and teens

Cons
  • Not able to search for therapist race or ethnicity

  • Can’t search for LGBTQIA+ therapists

  • Mission doesn’t mention social justice

Overview 

GoodTherapy’s directory focuses on providing high-quality mental health education and access to trained professionals who can provide therapy online and in person. This company has been at it for a long time. Founded in 2007, the database now contains thousands of providers located in 50 states and 26 countries. The website also includes helpful resources, including a research-backed blog, that 82% of users we surveyed thought were good or very good.  

To get started with GoodTherapy, you can search the directory for telehealth therapists licensed to practice in your area, a process 90% of those surveyed described as fairly easy or easy. Options to filter your search include pricing perks like sliding scale fees, specialty with issues like ADHD or eating disorders, insurance coverage, gender identity, and capacity to serve people in BIPOC and LGBTQIA+ communities. Particularly important for finding online therapists for youth, you can search for providers who are experts at working with children and teens in addition to searching for the age group of clients they serve. 

Being able to easily drill down your therapist selection means you have a better chance of quickly connecting with a therapist who is right for you or your child, and 98% of the people we surveyed felt like they were able to find a therapist that met all or some of their needs with GoodTherapy. It’s likely that its solid, easily searchable online therapy network is partly why 95% of the people we served rated GoodTherapy as good or very good overall.

Best Psychiatry: Talkiatry

Talkiatry

Key Specs

  • Price: Varies based on insurance
  • Insurance accepted: Yes
  • Communication options: Video, phone
  • Age: 5 and up

Why We Chose It

Talkiatry can connect your child to board-certified child and adolescent psychiatrists for prescription and medication management. The service also accepts insurance, making for very affordable rates. 

Pros & Cons

Pros
  • Accepts all major health insurance 

  • Flexible hours

  • Have board-certified child and adolescent psychiatrists

Cons
  • Only available in 42 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Does not serve patients without health insurance

Overview

Launched in 2020 in New York, Talkiatry now offers psychiatric care and medication management in 42 states and D.C. Board-certified child and adolescent psychiatrists are available to work with children aged five and up. The flexible hours—including morning, late evenings, and weekends—can make it easy to fit in video appointments outside of school hours and extracurricular activities. 

Aside from medication management, Talkiatry also offers talk therapy for children and teens. And the place isn’t a prescription factory. Of the users we surveyed, 85% said their Talkiatry psychiatrist’s bedside manner was good, very good, or excellent, and 78% said it compared favorably to prior medication management experience. Convenient, expert psychiatry with a caring touch likely contributed to 95% of the Talkiatry users we surveyed reporting a positive overall experience. 

Best for ADHD: Amwell

Amwell
Amwell

Key Specs

  • Price: $109 to $129 per session
  • Insurance accepted: Yes
  • Communication options: Video
  • Age: 10 and up

Why We Chose It

Amwell has licensed therapists and psychiatrists who are experts at treating ADHD and available to provide online children’s therapy for kids age 10 and up, including on evenings and weekends. It’s also in-network for many insurance providers. 

Pros & Cons

Pros
  • Expertise in treating ADHD

  • Staff of licensed therapists, psychiatrists, and doctors 

  • Accepts insurance

Cons
  • Not able to prescribe stimulants online

  • Per session cost higher than average

  • Offers video therapy only

Overview

Amwell is a leading telehealth giant founded in 2006. Child therapy with therapists and psychiatrists who specialize in diagnosing and treating ADHD in children is available, along with other medical and pediatric offerings. Amwell therapists are able to provide online counseling for kids age 10 and older.

Its ADHD approach is holistic, reflecting American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines for treating ADHD in kids, which recommends a combination of medication and therapy for kids older than 6. The treatment plans for ADHD may include medications, team activities, strategies for restful sleep, help with routines, and education about diet. It’s important to note that Amwell doctors can’t provide stimulant medication, like Adderall or Ritalin, due to federal regulations, but you can connect with your child’s in-person primary care provider to prescribe any recommended medication that falls in that category. You can schedule your video therapy appointments on evenings and weekends, offering flexibility for kids who have school during the day.

The Amwell users we surveyed were happy with their experience across a range of important factors. An overwhelming 88% said they had a positive overall experience, it was good value for their money, and it compared favorably to other services they’d used in the past. Amwell stands out for providing expert, accessible online ADHD mental health care to kids and teenagers.

Best for Eating Disorders: MDLIVE

MDLIVE Logo

MDLIVE

Key Specs

  • Price: $0 to $108 per session
  • Insurance accepted: Yes
  • Communication options: Video, phone
  • Age: 10 and up

Why We Chose It

MDLIVE is a reliable home for your telemedicine needs and provides online eating disorder treatment, including for children age 10 and up.

Pros & Cons

Pros
  • Able to treat eating disorders online

  • Has licensed therapists and board-certified psychiatrists

  • You can choose your therapist

Cons
  • Can’t view therapist bios before signup

  • Doesn’t provide family therapy

  • Platform can be glitchy

Overview

Like Amwell, MDLIVE is one of the forebears of telemedicine. Founded in 2009, it offers a suite of services that includes urgent care, primary care, and dermatology in addition to mental health treatment. MDLIVE provides online counseling, including specialized treatment for eating disorders, for kids aged 10 and up at a reasonable rate. 

Getting started with MDLIVE is easy, according to 81% of the people we surveyed. Once you sign up, you use the website portal or download the MDLIVE app on your smartphone to schedule your tween or teen for a video or phone appointment. The licensed therapists can help with a wide variety of mental health concerns, including eating disorders. 

For treating eating disorders in youth, two types of therapy have a particularly strong evidence base: Enhanced cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT-E) and family-based treatment (FBT). Research shows that both CBT-E and FBT can be effective in a virtual format. MDLIVE offers cognitive behavioral therapy but doesn’t appear to offer family therapy.  

Although medication can’t cure eating disorders, antidepressant and anti-anxiety prescriptions may be helpful alongside therapy. The fact that MDLIVE also has board-certified psychiatrists on the platform is a plus if you are interested in having the option to provide prescription support for your child who is struggling with an eating disorder. 

Of the MDLIVE users we surveyed, 91% were happy with their experience overall, and 86% would recommend MDLIVE to someone like them. Compared to other services they’d used in the past, 73% said MDLIVE was a little better, better, or much better. MDLIVE is a tried-and-true place to seek online therapy for tweens and teens, including for eating disorders.

Best for Bullying: Wellnite

Wellnite Review

Wellnite

Key Specs

  • Price: $450 monthly
  • Insurance accepted: Yes
  • Communication options: Phone, video, text
  • Age: 13 and up

Why We Chose It

Licensed therapists at Wellnite can work with teens on friendship and relationship issues, including bullying. You can choose a session length that makes sense for your teenager’s life.

Pros & Cons

Pros
  • Therapists specialize in friendship and relationship issues

  • Can choose 30-, 45-, or 60-minute sessions

  • Has medical plan for mental health medication

Cons
  • Only accepts PPO insurance plans

  • Focuses only on CBT

  • Only available in 17 states and Washington, D.C.

Overview

Wellnite is laser-focused on mental health and works with people age 13 and older. Founded in 2019, Wellnite started off treating adults for depression and anxiety. It’s since branched out and now treats teenagers as well. It stand out for its attention to interpersonal and relational problems, including bullying. Notably, Wellnite offers the option to have a therapy session with a friend, something distinctive in the online therapy space.

You can choose individual, couple, or family therapy and receive psychiatric care through Wellnite. Rather than billing you per session, Wellnite uses a membership model. Your out-of-pocket cost may be lower if you have a PPO plan or contact an onboarding specialist for a sliding scale option. Therapy membership includes six 60-minute sessions, four 45-minute sessions, or three 60-minute sessions each month. 

The people we surveyed were broadly happy with Wellnite. When compared to other services they’d used in the past, 83% said Wellnite was a little better, better, or much better, and 71% would recommend Wellnite to a friend or someone like them. In all, 80% felt positively about their experience at Wellnite. Wellnite’s expertise in relationship issues and capacity to provide therapy involving more than one person makes it an appropriate choice for teens seeking online therapy to address mental health concerns that stem from bullying. 

Best Group Support: LifeStance Health

LifeStance Health

LifeStance Health

Key Specs

  • Price: $75 to $300 per session, also accepts insurance
  • Insurance accepted: Yes
  • Communication options: In-person, video 
  • Age: 2 and up

Why We Chose It

With high user satisfaction and availability in most states, LifeStance Health is a stand-out option for online and in-person therapy for kids and teens. It’s one of the rare places you can find online group therapy for minors led by expert, licensed therapists.

Pros & Cons

Pros
  • Licensed therapists lead groups

  • Has individual, couples, and family therapy too

  • Child and adolescent psychiatrists available

Cons
  • Difficult to navigate website

  • No text messaging option

  • Not available in all 50 states

Overview

Group therapy can be a healing, supportive treatment option for kids. Initially, online group therapy was primarily for people who wanted the benefit of group therapy but were isolated by illness or location. Now research emerging from the COVID-19 pandemic indicates that online group therapy is here to stay for a widening pool of people.

Very few companies that provide online group therapy also serve minors, but LifeStance Health offers group therapy and says it can work with clients aged 2 and older. Founded in 2017, Lifestance provides behavioral health services in 32 states. 

The process of searching for a group therapist for your child at LifeStance Health is a little cumbersome. You can search through the list of therapists and narrow your results by selecting "group" for treatment area and your child’s age for patient age. From there, you can contact a therapist you’d like to work with to ask about their offerings. In addition to group therapy, LifeStance Health offers psychiatry and medication management, psychotherapy, child and adolescent therapy, child and adolescent psychiatry, couples therapy, and family therapy. All of these virtual mental health appointments can take place on your computer or mobile device using a secure telehealth app. 

Once they were connected with a therapist, 88% of the users we surveyed rated their overall experience with LifeStance Health as good, very good, or excellent, and 75% said they’d be likely to recommend LifeStance Health to someone like them.

Final Verdict

If you’re looking for virtual therapy for your kid, Talkspace is the best place to start for most people. While some companies only serve parts of the country, Talkspace works wherever you are in the United States. Your teen can choose from thousands of licensed therapists to find the best fit for them and talk to them in whatever way works best.

For now, Talkspace therapists can only see adolescents, so if you’re looking for therapy for young children, check out Little Otter. And if you only need help with online psychiatry or medication management, you can’t do better than Talkiatry. On the other hand, if you’re hoping to connect your child with a therapist but would rather find your child’s online therapist independently, the GoodTherapy directory is an excellent place to search.

Compare the Best Online Therapy for Teenagers and Kids

Company  Price Insurance Accepted  Communication Options  Age Group 
Talkspace Best Overall $69 - $129 weekly Yes  Text messaging, video 13 and up
Little Otter Best for Young Kids  $200 per session Yes  Video, phone  0 - 14 
Teen Counseling Best for Teens  $60 to $90 weekly No Messaging, live chat, phone, video  13 - 19 
Thriveworks Best for Family Therapy  $39 monthly membership plus $99 per session Yes  Video, phone, in-person  Children, teens, and adults 
LiveHealth Online Best for BIPOC Children  $80 - $95 per session Yes  Video  10 and up 
Kip Therapy Best for LGBTQIA+ Children  $65 - $250 per session No Video, phone  12 and up 
GoodTherapy Best Directory  Directory is free; cost of therapy varies based on provider Depends on therapist Depends on therapist Depends on therapist
Talkiatry Best Psychiatry  Varies based on your insurance Yes Video, phone 5 and up
Amwell Best for ADHD  $109 - $129 per session Yes  Video  10 and up 
MD Live Best for Eating Disorders  $0 - 108 per session Yes  Video, phone  10 and up 
Wellnite Best for Bullying  $450 monthly Yes  Phone, video, text  13 and up 
LifeStance Health Best Group Support  Varies per session Yes  In-person, video  2 and up 

Guide to Choosing the Best Online Therapy for Teenagers and Kids 

Deciding What Type of Therapy Is Right for Your Teen or Kid  

It can feel overwhelming to figure out what kind of therapy your teen or kid needs. To narrow down the options, it helps to think about two things: what mental health challenge your child is struggling with and what type of therapy is best for helping with that problem. 

Part of a therapist’s job is to get a handle on what’s going on with your child, but it can help to have an idea of what you’re dealing with in advance. Is your child anxious or on edge? They may be dealing with anxiety. Or maybe they’re low-energy, down, or hopeless, which could signal depression. If your child seems to need to check things over or repeat actions many times to be sure they are done properly, it could be obsessive-compulsive disorder. Or, it could be a combination of any of these. Even if none of these mental health conditions seem to fit your child, it can help to take some time before you sign them up for child online therapy to think about what, in particular, has been troubling them.

As far as the type of treatment, the Society of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology recommends evidence-based therapies for youth, including cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and family therapy. Particular therapies seem to work best for certain problems your child might be dealing with. For instance, CBT can effectively treat anxiety in all ages. 

How Much Does Online Therapy Cost? 

Online therapy for kids and teenagers generally costs between $276 and $450 monthly for subscription-based models and between $65 and $300 per visit for pay-per-session models. Some online therapy companies provide payment options like sliding-scale rates or financial aid that can reduce your out-of-pocket costs. For online therapy providers that take insurance, your cost per session may be even lower. Even for online therapy services that don’t accept insurance, you can request a superbill which can make it easier to unlock out-of-network insurance benefits and receive some cost reimbursement.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is Online Therapy for Teenagers and Kids Effective? 

A growing body of research suggests that online therapy for teenagers and kids can be effective. Online cognitive-behavioral therapy, in particular, seems to work well for kids. Online therapy for teenagers and kids is thought to be most effective when best practices are followed, such as those recommended by the American Psychological Association

Do BetterHelp and Talkspace Offer Online Therapy Programs for Kids and Teens? 

BetterHelp and Talkspace do not offer therapy programs for younger kids, but both have options for teens through their main company or their affiliates. BetterHelp itself does not provide mental health therapy to minors, but its sister site Teen Counseling offers online therapy to teens aged 13 to 19. Talkspace offers online therapy programs for teens aged 13 and older with parental consent.

Are There Any Free Options for Online Therapy? 

Yes. There are some free options for online therapy for kids. For example, some workplaces partner with Talkspace to offer free online therapy with licensed mental health providers to employees and their family members who are aged 13 and up. If your child is in a mental health crisis, you can receive free mental health care quickly wherever you are by calling the 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline. A trained crisis worker will listen to what’s going on, provide support, and connect you with additional resources.

Can Online Therapists Provide Diagnosis and Treatment Options? 

Yes. Online therapists can provide diagnosis and treatment options, including for kids and teens. However, some online therapists and online therapy platforms, such as Talkspace, will not provide a formal diagnosis and treatment for mental disorders, according to their terms of use. Online therapists who limit their scope in this way instead focus on supportive counseling and coping skills. 

Methodology

Our methodology combined quantitative and qualitative methods to provide an in-depth and well-rounded assessment of the top 55 online therapy companies. We collected survey data from 105 users of each company. We also investigated these companies by conducting a thorough analysis of available information and employing testers to report in detail on their experience. Therapy is a deeply personal experience, so to select the best online therapy for kids and teens, we looked for big-picture trends in our data, giving extra weight to factors such as ease of use, overall satisfaction, value for money, and whether users would recommend the therapy to someone like them. To find the stand-out options fit for children and adolescents, in particular, we analyzed the types of therapy offered, ages served, and therapist specialization relevant to serving youth.

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Sources
Parents uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.
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