52 Week Old Baby Development

Learn everything you need to know about your 52 week old baby. Track important developments and milestones such as talking, walking, growth, memory & more.

Your Growing Baby Image

Happy 1st Birthday!

Happy birthday, Baby! Can you believe it's been a whole year since she arrived? Now the helpless, wailing bundle you brought home from the hospital has a big personality, is becoming more independent every day, and is seriously mobile (which just might make you miss the days when she would sit perfectly content in her swing or bouncy seat). She also understands a lot of what you say now, and is likely saying a word or a few herself. But the best thing of all is that her journey into personhood is just beginning. In the next year, your toddler's language skills will keep improving until she can communicate with people who, unlike you, don't understand her hand gestures, or get that "wah" means water. And on the physical front, she'll progress from a wobbly walker to being able to run, jump, and dance.

At this stage, your toddler's well aware that he's a separate person, and -- thanks to your nurturing -- thinks he's pretty darn special! As time goes on and his concept of self grows stronger, he'll have less trouble meeting strangers and leaving you for short periods. But he'll always crave your love and support.

Your Growing Baby

Happy 1st Birthday!

Happy birthday, Baby! Can you believe it's been a whole year since she arrived? Now the helpless, wailing bundle you brought home from the hospital has a big personality, is becoming more independent every day, and is seriously mobile (which just might make you miss the days when she would sit perfectly content in her swing or bouncy seat). She also understands a lot of what you say now, and is likely saying a word or a few herself. But the best thing of all is that her journey into personhood is just beginning. In the next year, your toddler's language skills will keep improving until she can communicate with people who, unlike you, don't understand her hand gestures, or get that "wah" means water. And on the physical front, she'll progress from a wobbly walker to being able to run, jump, and dance.

At this stage, your toddler's well aware that he's a separate person, and -- thanks to your nurturing -- thinks he's pretty darn special! As time goes on and his concept of self grows stronger, he'll have less trouble meeting strangers and leaving you for short periods. But he'll always crave your love and support.

Your Health Safety Info Image

Ready for Cow's Milk & More

Remember being told, "Don't snack; you'll spoil your appetite"? Now pediatricians and nutritionists say kids actually should have between-meal nibbles; the extra bursts of energy keep them going, and snacks give your child a chance to consume a wider variety of nutrients than they would with just three meals a day. Make sure each snack contains a mix of healthy carbs and protein, such as a little yogurt with whole grain cereal or cottage cheese with banana slices. And don't feel like you have to ply your child with food to get him to behave in the grocery store. Weight problems often begin in toddlerhood, so it's smart to save snacks for the table instead of the supermarket cart so your child feels like he's eating to feel full, not just munching to pass time.

One healthy snack your baby's ready for: cow's milk. Experts generally recommend waiting until your child is 12 months old before giving him milk because until now, his digestive system was too immature to break it down properly. Switching from formula is usually no biggie, since milk tends to taste better to toddlers. Weaning him off breast milk might be a little tougher. Try mixing breast milk with cow's milk in the same sippy cup, then slowly including less breast milk until you're giving him just a couple of ounces of plain cow's milk. He'll take to it eventually. Also, make sure you're using whole milk, not skim or two percent. Toddlers need the extra fat in their diets.

Healthy & Safety Info

Ready for Cow's Milk & More

Remember being told, "Don't snack; you'll spoil your appetite"? Now pediatricians and nutritionists say kids actually should have between-meal nibbles; the extra bursts of energy keep them going, and snacks give your child a chance to consume a wider variety of nutrients than they would with just three meals a day. Make sure each snack contains a mix of healthy carbs and protein, such as a little yogurt with whole grain cereal or cottage cheese with banana slices. And don't feel like you have to ply your child with food to get him to behave in the grocery store. Weight problems often begin in toddlerhood, so it's smart to save snacks for the table instead of the supermarket cart so your child feels like he's eating to feel full, not just munching to pass time.

One healthy snack your baby's ready for: cow's milk. Experts generally recommend waiting until your child is 12 months old before giving him milk because until now, his digestive system was too immature to break it down properly. Switching from formula is usually no biggie, since milk tends to taste better to toddlers. Weaning him off breast milk might be a little tougher. Try mixing breast milk with cow's milk in the same sippy cup, then slowly including less breast milk until you're giving him just a couple of ounces of plain cow's milk. He'll take to it eventually. Also, make sure you're using whole milk, not skim or two percent. Toddlers need the extra fat in their diets.

Your Must Knows Image

Ready for Another?

Of course, if you're really longing for the baby days, it could be a sign that it's time to think about baby No. 2. While doctors recommend that your kids be at least a year apart, primarily to provide plenty of recovery time for Mom, there are lots of wonderful things about having two children close in age: They'll be going through similar developmental stages, they'll be able to share toys, and they'll both always have a playmate. Whether you're ready to expand your family or just happy with the one you have, you have lots to look forward to in the coming years.

Must-Knows

Ready for Another?

Of course, if you're really longing for the baby days, it could be a sign that it's time to think about baby No. 2. While doctors recommend that your kids be at least a year apart, primarily to provide plenty of recovery time for Mom, there are lots of wonderful things about having two children close in age: They'll be going through similar developmental stages, they'll be able to share toys, and they'll both always have a playmate. Whether you're ready to expand your family or just happy with the one you have, you have lots to look forward to in the coming years.