Daylight Saving Time Gives Twins a Unique Quandary About Who's Older

Which twin do you think is older?
Good Morning America/YouTube

Daylight Saving Time has made these twin brothers' times of birth rather confusing.

According to ABC News, Massachusetts parents Emily and Seth Peterson welcomed son Samuel at 1:39 a.m on November 6. But then, the clocks changed at 2:00 a.m., causing the local time to fall back by an hour. When Samuel's brother Ronan arrived 31 minutes later, instead of declaring his official time of birth to be 2:10 a.m., it was recorded as 1:10 a.m., making him older than his brother—at least on paper.

So who really is older? Well, Samuel was born first, but Ronan's time of birth is earlier. Does anyone else have a headache?

"My husband was the first to say it, 'Here's a riddle for you!'" Emily Peterson told ABC News, adding: "It literally took me a day to wrap my head around it. I didn't realize it was quite that big of a deal until my nurse turned around and said 'I've been working here 40 years and haven't seen anything like that.'"

Cape Cod Healthcare echoed the family's disbelief, saying in a statement that "the Peterson twins' birth story was a remarkable occurrence."

Phenomenons aside, Peterson says about her sons' futures, "I personally think it's kind of cool that one's 'older' and one's born first. Hopefully they're not going to be fighting over it for the rest of their lives."

But hold on. If you think the Peterson twins' birth circumstances are unique, wait until you read about the twins who were born in different years!

If your twins have unique birth circumstances, please share your story with us!

Melissa Willets is a writer/blogger and a mom. Find her on Facebook where she chronicles her life momming under the influence. Of coffee.

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