Emily Edlynn

Emily Edlynn, Ph.D.

Emily Edlynn, Ph.D., is the author of The Art and Science of Mom parenting blog and the upcoming parenting book Parenting for Autonomy. She is a mother of three from Oak Park, Illinois and a clinical psychologist in private practice who specializes in working with children and adolescents.
Parents often stress about kids and social skills, so it can be helpful to remember that social styles can look really different across ages and personalities, and still be healthy and typical. Parents.com's "Ask Your Mom" columnist, Emily Edlynn, Ph.D., says the key is to support our children in growing their social skills in a way that matches what feels natural to them.
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Aggression leads to more social problems over the long term. Parents.com's "Ask Your Mom" columnist, Emily Edlynn, Ph.D., says teaching children the power of assertiveness skills can protect them from bullying and help them build stronger, healthier social relationships now and in their future.
Social media amplifies the normal growing pains of young friendships. Parents.com's "Ask Your Mom" columnist, Emily Edlynn, Ph.D., says this experience gives us the chance to coach our children to develop healthy boundaries and coping, for the digital world and the real world.
Navigating a new relationship after the loss of a partner is always a challenge, but doing it as a parent adds even more complications. Parents.com's "Ask Your Mom" columnist, Emily Edlynn, Ph.D., says grief can cloud our judgment at times, but tuning into values for our lives and relationships can help us make both life and parenting decisions that are true to what's most important.
This decision comes down to balancing safety concerns with social well-being. Parents.com's "Ask Your Mom" columnist, Emily Edlynn, Ph.D., shares how to do it while preserving relationships between our children, and all of us as parents.
We all want to protect our children from bullies, but it takes a village. Parents.com's "Ask Your Mom" columnist, Emily Edlynn, Ph.D., says to create an anti-bullying culture, we need to include the bully instead of further excluding them.
Every grandparent-grandchild relationship is unique. But there can be a disconnect between what you want for your kids and your own parents' limitations. Parents.com's "Ask Your Mom" columnist, Emily Edlynn, Ph.D., says you can help pave the way to a good relationship with communication and acceptance.
Behavior changes in young children may be frustrating and confusing, but a very normal response to big life changes. Parents.com's "Ask Your Mom" columnist, Emily Edlynn, Ph.D., says parents can help by modeling positive coping and staying as connected as possible as a stable, reliable source of love and support.
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This past year has cranked up the stress and anxiety for most families. Fortunately, you can take steps to be the champion of calm in the household, teaching your children important skills that will help now and in the future. Parents.com's "Ask Your Mom" columnist, Emily Edlynn, Ph.D., shares how.
It can be tricky to navigate how other parents handle your child, especially in public play spaces. Parents.com's "Ask Your Mom" columnist, Emily Edlynn, Ph.D., says the more we can focus on what we want to help our children learn from other children and adults, the better for everyone.
Girls can be especially socially and emotionally vulnerable to starting puberty before friends. Parents.com's "Ask Your Mom" columnist, Emily Edlynn, Ph.D., says a parent's job is to balance sensitivity and support with making sure your child has access to reliable information.
We all hope our children will be "more than siblings," and have true friendships. But there's only so much we can do. Parents.com's "Ask Your Mom" columnist, Emily Edlynn, Ph.D., says for young children with a baby sibling, they need plenty of time, attention, and connection to feel secure in their big sibling role.
What sounds like a suicidal statement by a young child may mean something very different, says Parents.com's "Ask Your Mom" columnist, Emily Edlynn, Ph.D. She shares how to help them manage their strong, difficult emotions and when to seek professional help.
Children's grief looks different from adults' grief. Parents.com's "Ask Your Mom" columnist, Emily Edlynn, Ph.D., says that understanding a child's grief, and responding in several key ways, can offer the love and support necessary for a child to cope the best they can.
It can feel impossible to find balance between parents, especially in the early years of raising children. Parents.com's "Ask Your Mom" columnist, Emily Edlynn, Ph.D., says the key is to keep communicating and make changes until you find a system that works for both of you, even if a truly equal 50/50 divide may never happen.
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A mom turns to Reddit for advice on what sneaking food at a friend's house could imply. Parents.com's "Ask Your Mom" columnist, Emily Edlynn, Ph.D., says getting more information can help guide you to either offer healthy boundaries at your house or communicate concerns to the girl's parents that could end up getting her more needed support.
Life in a global pandemic has brought higher anxiety for all ages, including for many children. Fortunately, there are science-based strategies parents can use at home to help their children cope with transitioning back to more normal living.
Between the constant sibling rivalry for attention and young children's experimentation with lying, blaming a younger sibling for bad behavior is completely normal. Parents.com's "Ask Your Mom" columnist, Emily Edlynn, Ph.D., says you can help your child move through this phase and learn how to get his needs met in more positive ways.
Your child wants this party and it can be hard to know how to make a decision when what might be good for our child may not be good for us. Parents.com's "Ask Your Mom" columnist, Emily Edlynn, Ph.D., says that there is not a right or wrong choice as long as you are honest with your daughter and yourself.
Parents can support healthy self-esteem in children without falsely inflating self-confidence. Parents.com's "Ask Your Mom" columnist, Emily Edlynn, Ph.D., says you can focus on your child's love of the sport and allow other sources to give him the honest feedback.
Raising a child with special needs affects the whole family, and siblings often struggle with jealousy. Parents.com's "Ask Your Mom" columnist, Emily Edlynn, Ph.D., shares some simple strategies parents can follow to help a sibling feel important, connected, and their own unique brand of special.
Although adoption brings up unique parenting challenges, all parents struggle with balancing difficult emotions with our child's best interest. Processing strong emotions, connecting with our child's experience, and accessing support can help us keep our child's interest ahead of our own when that is indeed what is best for them.
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It's important to keep up neighborly relationships, but setting boundaries firmly and kindly will help teach your child to do the same, making an uncomfortable situation now a lesson to last a lifetime.
Divorce is messy and complicated for everyone in the family it touches. Figuring out a new normal for you and your kids is part of the process of grieving the loss of family as you knew it, and everyone sacrifices. Keeping family connections is best, but it may have to look different, and change with time.
It is normal for teenagers to be embarrassed by their parents, but difficult feelings and behaviors need to be addressed within the context of a close relationship. Building and maintaining this closeness takes creativity and persistence, and often, our own self-awareness.