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Baby's First Year

The growth that takes place during the first year of an infant’s life is astonishing. There’s no other period in life where physical, mental and social development is so dramatic. Watch a baby develop throughout his first 12 months of life.

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The growth that takes place during the first year of an infant's life is astonishing. There is no other period in life where physical, mental and social development is so dramatic. Let's meet Nate. We'll be following Nate through the first 12 months of his life, watching his development. We'll see how gradually he gains control of his limbs as well as observe his mental and social development. A baby's muscular control develops from top down, meaning that Nate will learn to control his head and upper body before he can sit, crawl, stand up and walk his first steps. During his first three months, Nate will gradually discover his hands and what they're meant for. His hand-eye coordination begins to develop so he can grasp objects that he wishes to study more closely. During his first year, he'll also become more social and the videos will show us how Nate starts to communicate through cries, smiles, gestures, sounds and eventually words. The videos describe the steps in Nate's development through his first year of life. Every child will go through these same steps. However, children do not develop at the same rate and may not go through the steps in the same order as Nate. Some infants skip some steps altogether. Not every child will learn to crawl. Some will be shufflers or rollers and some may learn to walk before crawling. These individual differences may be due to genetic or cultural variations. Don't worry if your child's development differs a bit from Nate's. Chances are, your child is ahead of Nate in some areas but is slower in others. Watch these videos to understand normal infant development and to be better prepared to play and stimulate your child. Also, you will learn how to [time=0:[02:30] secure your home and prevent situations where your child may endanger himself. When your child starts to move objects or is crawling or walking around, child-proofing his surroundings will allow him to explore and use his new abilities in a safe setting.