4 Easy Ways to Enhance Your Child's Memory

Easy ways that you can help your child's memory develop.

Memories enrich children's lives and provide them with lots to talk about, which in turn enhances their language skills. Here are some ways to build your child's memory bank.

1. Establish routines. Young children thrive on them, and they make perfect fodder for enhancing your child's memory. If your 1-year-old knows that he snuggles with his bear each night after his bath, he'll start to get the bear himself. As he grows older, you can enhance the language-memory link by asking "What happens after you take your bath?"

2. Play memory games. Ask questions when you're out and about. For example, if you're passing a friend's house, ask, "Who lives there?" Games like this give children experience in recalling information.

3. Demonstrate how to perform tasks. Babies model their parents' actions. If you want your child to learn how to do something, such as stack one block on another, show him how and then give him a turn. Doing, rather than simply observing, helps your baby store information more solidly. Be sure to repeat the action on different occasions, too. While babies can learn from a single example, they remember best when you repeat the action periodically over several days.

4. Talk with your child about her experiences. Focus on events that resonated strongly with her, such as a trip to the zoo. As she gets a little older, help her make stories out of her recollections. Your child's memories will be richer, and she'll learn how to relay them in a clear form. Soon enough, she'll be reminding you of all the good times you've had together.

The information on this Web site is designed for educational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for informed medical advice or care. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat any health problems or illnesses without consulting your pediatrician or family doctor. Please consult a doctor with any questions or concerns you might have regarding your or your child's condition.

Parents Are Talking

Add a Comment