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Is Your Child's School Toxic?

 
WHAT PARENTS AND OTHERS SHOULD LOOK FOR:

  • Suspect that your school has indoor environmental problems when:
  • The roof leaks
  • The building is new or newly renovated and still smells like paint, varnish, or glue.
  • The building is fully carpeted
  • Your child goes to school healthy but comes home ill, cranky, or exhausted.
  • Your child comes home with odd odors clinging to his/her clothing.
  • Your child has health or learning problems ONLY in that building.
  • Building maintenance and repairs costs are often cut at budget time.
  • The building smells damp or musty, or has been flooded.

WHAT PARENTS AND OTHERS SHOULD ASK THEIR SCHOOLS:

  • Is there a preventive maintenance plan?
  • Do you prevent pests without the routine use of toxic chemicals?
  • Do you promote good indoor air quality by preventing mold and dust, and by using nontoxic products?
  • Are the plumbing and wiring adequate?
  • Do you tell parents and employees in advance of hazards, such as pesticide use or renovations?
  • Do you inspect and control lead, asbestos, and radon?
  • Do you respond quickly to complaints?
  • Are there wholesome foods for snacks and meals?
  • Are the heating, lighting, ventilation, windows, doors, and buses energy efficient?
  • Do you protect occupants during renovation and construction?

IF THE ANSWER TO ANY OF THESE QUESTIONS IS "YES":

Ask your school's principal to consider implementing the Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools program created by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. An easy-to-use kit, including checklists, background information and a unique IAQ Problem Solving Kit is available here: http://www.epa.gov/iaq/schools/tools4s2.html.

Related Links:
 

Source: Healthy Schools Networks