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How to Treat Baby Acne

When to Worry: Acne & Milia
When to Worry: Acne & Milia
baby acne

Know the cause. Hormones are the likely culprit behind baby acne, which usually shows up on the cheeks, forehead, and nose. Genetics may also be a factor.

Identify the two types. Neonatal acne generally shows up within the first three months after birth and lasts no more than a few months. Infantile acne appears between 3 and 6 months of age and goes away within a year or two.

Treat it. Wash Baby's face daily with a gentle cleanser. If the acne is severe or you notice deep cysts, notify your pediatrician. He may prescribe a topical treatment or oral antibiotics. Also call the doc if neonatal acne lasts longer than 4 to 6 months, so he can check for a hormonal disorder.

Avoid irritation. Scrubbing the skin and using harsh cleansers are not recommended, as they can irritate Baby's sensitive skin.

Copyright © 2012 Meredith Corporation.

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