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Avoiding Morning Sickness

Question

Are there certain foods that help combat morning sickness? I'm nauseated all day long and crackers don't seem to help at all.

Answer

Morning sickness, caused by changing hormone levels, is now called pregnancy sickness, as it can occur at any time of day and throughout the pregnancy. It's a very normal sign of pregnancy, usually disappearing after 14 weeks. There is no single guaranteed remedy for pregnancy sickness, but there are a few things you can try. Eating carbohydrate-rich foods, especially right before you get up in the morning, may help. Try graham crackers, granola bars, rice cakes, or pretzels. Eating a protein-rich snack before bed may also help. Try cheese and crackers, yogurt, milk, or nuts. Have drinks at a cold temperature. Lemonade and potato chips have worked well for some women. Try some products with ginger in them, such as ginger candy, dried ginger, or ginger tea. Nonfood remedies include a kind of wrist band normally used for seasickness. Although it has not been proven to alleviate nausea, some extra vitamin B6 will not harm the fetus, and some women have found that it provided relief.

The information on this Web site is designed for educational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for informed medical advice or care. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat any health problems or illnesses without consulting your pediatrician or family doctor. Please consult a doctor with any questions or concerns you might have regarding your or your child's condition.