The Best Books for Dads

These useful books and reflective memoirs can help guide dads through parenthood.
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Photodisc Red

These useful books and reflective memoirs can help guide dads through the amazing journey of parenthood:

Do I Look Like a Daddy to You? A Survival Guide for First-Time Fathers

by Quinton Skinner (Dell, $13.95).
In this candid and hilarious book, Skinner explores such issues as attending birthing class, delivery-room etiquette, sleep deprivation, and keeping romance alive postpartum.

Fatherneed: Why Father Care is as Essential as Mother Care for Your Child

by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D. (Broadway, $12.95).
Based on more than 20 years of research at the Yale Child Study Center, this book by psychiatrist Pruett explores how fathers shape a child's emotional and cognitive development.

Father for Life: A Journey of Joy, Challenge, and Change

by Armin A. Brott (Abbeville Press, $24.95).
In this thorough, engaging book, Brott explores how fathers evolve from the birth of a child through adolescence and beyond -- and how children influence their dads' development. Brott's personal experience, combined with advice from experts and interviews with other fathers, adds up to wise guidance on what it means to be a devoted dad over time.

Lessons for Dylan: From Father to Son

by Joel Siegel (PublicAffairs, $22.95).
Two weeks after the birth of his first child, Siegel (Good Morning America's movie critic) learned that he had colon cancer. With humor and insight, he offers entertaining stories of family history and lessons for living.

Monkey Dancing: A Father, Two Kids, and a Journey to the Ends of the Earth

by Daniel Glick (PublicAffairs, $26).
After the death of his brother and an unexpected divorce from his wife of 15 years, journalist Glick found himself lonely and left to care for his young daughter and son. In this inspiring memoir, he describes his transformative six-month trip around the world with his children.

Twenty Days With Julian & Little Bunny

by Nathaniel Hawthorne (New York Review of Books, $16.95).
This brief narrative is a touching and humorous account of how one of the best-known writers in American literature managed to care for his young son while his wife and daughters were away visiting relatives. His true-life tale of limited adult companionship, endless questions from his inquisitive child, and crises concerning a pet bunny shines a delightful light on family life.

Copyright © 2003. Reprinted with permission from the June/July 2003 issue of Child magazine.

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