The Measles Mumps Rubella (MMR) Vaccine: Health 101

Is the MMR vaccine really necessary?

Because measles, mumps, and rubella have nearly disappeared from the United States, some people may think that getting vaccinated is no longer necessary. Not so. Unfortunately, just because these diseases are no longer widespread here doesn't mean we're completely immune -- outbreaks can and do happen, usually because of some children skipping immunizations, says Neal Halsey, MD, director of the Institute for Vaccine Safety at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health in Maryland and a member of the Parents magazine board of advisors. "In order to prevent future outbreaks -- and keep our children healthy -- it's crucial that we continue to get our kids vaccinated against these diseases completely and on time."

Sources: Neal Halsey, MD, director of the Institute for Vaccine Safety at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health in Maryland and a member of the Parents magazine board of advisors. Michael T. Brady, MD, the Vice Chair of the AAP's Committee on Infectious Diseases. Paul Offit, MD, Chief of Infectious Diseases at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia in Pennsylvania and a member of the American Baby magazine advisory board member. CDC sections on MMR Vaccination. Archives of Disease in Childhood "Measles vaccination and antibody response in autism spectrum disorder" 2008.


Copyright © 2008 Parents.com. Updated 2010. Reviewed and updated in 2012.

All content on this Web site, including medical opinion and any other health-related information, is for informational purposes only and should not be considered to be a specific diagnosis or treatment plan for any individual situation. Use of this site and the information contained herein does not create a doctor-patient relationship. Always seek the direct advice of your own doctor in connection with any questions or issues you may have regarding your own health or the health of others.

Parents Are Talking

Add a Comment