6 Secrets of Kids Who Rarely Get Sick

Do you know that neighborhood kid who never seems to come down with anything? Do his parents know something you don't? Probably not, experts say, but put these six habits of healthy kids to use to avoid illness this year.

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Keep hands clean

Alexandra Rowley

Keep hands clean

Regular hand-washing dramatically reduces the passing of respiratory and gastrointestinal illness, so get your kids in the habit of scrubbing up (or using a hand sanitizer) when they leave preschool or day care, after every playdate, and before they eat. Teach kids to sing "Happy Birthday" to themselves twice before rinsing -- scrubbing for 15-20 seconds is key.

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Be active every day

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Be active every day

Studies indicate that regular, moderate exercise can reduce the number of cold and flu episodes that occur over the course of a year by 25-50 percent, possibly by boosting the circulation of infection-fighting cells. "Exercise is better than any advertised cure or miracle," says Harley A. Rotbart, M.D., Parents advisor and author of Germ Proof Your Kids: the Complete Guide to Protecting (Without Overprotecting) Your Family from Infections.

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Get plenty of ZZZs

Heather Weston

Get plenty of ZZZs

Make sure kids stick to an early bedtime. Sleep deprivation nearly doubles the risk of getting a cold or flu, Dr. Rotbart says. Most babies need approximately 14 hours of sleep a day; preschoolers need 11-13 hours of Z's.

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Avoid touching your face

Shannon Greer

Avoid touching your face

Cold and flu viruses enter the body through the nose, eyes, and mouth, so help your child keep her hands away from those areas. Yes, it can be very difficult to accomplish -- hand-washing at strategic moments is all the more important. Teach your child never to share a straw, cup, or toothbrush.

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Consume a balanced and healthy diet

Greg Scheidemann

Consume a balanced and healthy diet

Meals with plenty of colorful fruits and vegetables will help boost your child's immune system. Look for foods rich in vitamin C (broccoli, strawberries, and oranges) and vitamin D (tuna, fortified milk, and cereals). Eating yogurt with active cultures (probiotics) can also help build defenses.

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Get the flu vaccine

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Get the flu vaccine

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says it's the single best way to prevent the flu. What are you waiting for?

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How Safe is the Flu Vaccine?

A pediatrician from Le Bonheur Children's Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee explains why the flu vaccine is recommended for pregnant women and babies as young as 6 months.

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