Old MacDonald: Sing-Along Song Video for Kids

Use this barnyard song to teach your kids about farm animal sounds.
Old MacDonald Had a Farm
Old MacDonald Had a Farm

Old MacDonald had a farm
E-I-E-I-O
And on that farm he had a cow
E-I-E-I-O
With a "moo-moo" here
and a "moo-moo" there
Here a "moo"
There a "moo"
Everywhere a "moo-moo"
Old MacDonald had a farm
E-I-E-I-O

Old MacDonald had a farm
E-I-E-I-O
And on that farm he had a pig
E-I-E-I-O
With an "oink-oink" here
and an "oink-oink" there
Here an "oink"
There an "oink"
Everywhere an "oink-oink"
Old MacDonald had a farm
E-I-E-I-O

Old MacDonald had a farm
E-I-E-I-O
And on that farm he had a horse
E-I-E-I-O
With a "neigh-neigh" here
and a "neigh-neigh" there
Here a "neigh"
There a "neigh"
Everywhere a "neigh-neigh"
Old MacDonald had a farm
E-I-E-I-O

"Old MacDonald" is sung by millions of children every year. But how far back does this song go? Some historians point to a 1719 opera called Kingdom of the Birds, in which one character sings:

In the Fields in Frost and Snows,
Watching late and early;
There I keep my Father's Cows,
There I Milk 'em Yearly:
Booing here, Booing there,
Here a Boo, there a Boo,
Every where a Boo, We defy all Care and Strife,
In a Charming Country-Life.

In 1908, a 74-year-old woman in a London workhouse was recorded singing a song called "The Farmyard":

Up was I on my fa-ther's farm
On a May day morn-ing ear-ly;
Feed-ing of my fa-ther's cows
On a May day morn-ing ear-ly,
With a moo moo here and a moo moo there,
Here a moo, there a moo, Here a pret-ty moo.
Six pret-ty maids come and gang a-long o' me
To the mer-ry green fields of the farm-yard.

By 1917, a more recognizable version was published in a collection of World War I-era songs:

Old Macdougal had a farm in Ohio-i-o,
And on that farm he had some dogs in Ohio-i-o,
With a bow-wow here, and a bow-wow there,
Here a bow, there a wow, everywhere a bow-wow.

The most modern version simply reels off a variety of barnyard animals with the accompanying sounds, each verse adding the previous sound to a long string until, by the end of the song, children are mooing, neighing, barking, meowing, quacking, and clucking.

The song can continue as long as the singers have patience and can think of new animals to add to the repertoire. The tune is attributed to the Sam Patterson Trio, who released the song under the Edison label in 1925.

Copyright © 2011 Meredith Corporation.

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