Archive for the ‘ Disability ’ Category

Dancing With The Wheelchair Stars

Thursday, July 10th, 2014

A global wheelchair dancing competition recently finished in Beijing; the winners will head to the Asia Paralympic Games, which will be held in Korea in the October. It’ll be the first time wheelchair dance is a competition category in those games.

There were 116 contestants from eight countries at the competition including an 85-year-old woman, as reported on CCTV. Wheelchair dancing is a big-deal sport these days. If you have a child who uses a wheelchair, check into local classes, like the ones offered around the country by American DanceWheels instructors and The Dancing Wheels Company & School in Cleveland. Check out the video:

Competing is tough work; the dancers get blisters on their hands from gripping the chair’s wheels. The moves also take a whole lot of upper-body strength. But watching the video of the dancers in action in Beijing, all you see is their grace, technique and energy, along with the joy they take in their movement—exactly what any dancer aims to achieve.

For me, this is about great dancing, period. For some dancers, it’s much more. As one said, “The wheels are like my wings that help me realize my dreams and fly me to a bigger stage.”

From my other blog:

5 fun summer activities for kids with special needs

The connections you make with other parents in Special Needs World

You never stop appreciating the milestones, big or small

 

Image: Screen-grab, CCTV News

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A New Bike Built For Kids With Special Needs

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014

This is a post in the weekly Autism Hopes series by Lisa Quinones-Fontanez, a mom who blogs  over at Atypical Familia.

Jyrobike is the World’s First Auto Balance Bicycle that features a patented Control Hub in the front wheel that uses gyroscopic technology to keep riders upright, even when they tip or wobble.

Riding a bike has not come easily for my son, Norrin. After he was diagnosed with autism, we learned that he didn’t have the strength or the coordination to pedal. For years we’ve worked with therapists trying to build up Norrin’s muscle strength and teaching him how to balance. We’ve bought tricycles, big wheels and even scooters – hoping Norrin would be able to master one. Eventually Norrin learned to pedal but he still lacked the focus, tired easily and had difficulty maintaining balance.

Last spring, we bought Norrin his first real bike. And while he showed an interest in riding it, he still needed a lot of work. Even with the training wheels he still had trouble with balance and had difficulty turning. Now that bike is too small and we’re wondering whether or not we should buy another. Norrin will still need training wheels and it may be years before he learns to balance independently.

That’s when I heard about the kickstarter campaign for Jyrobike I knew I had to share it! It’s the ideal solution for kids like mine. “Jyrobike is built on the core principle that bikes become inherently stable at higher speeds because the faster the wheels spin, the more balanced it becomes.” While originally designed for 3 – 8 year olds, “one of [the company's] stretch goal rewards will be very popular with parents of older children.” There are also plans to launch an adult product.

Jyrobike will change the lives of so many families with special needs, especially kids with autism. It allows children to learn to ride a bicycle with confidence and a sense of security. It will provide the physical activity they need to maintain their health and it’s a social activity that can be shared with family and friends. Bike riding is a skill that can lead to a more independent life.

To learn more about Jyrobike visit http://www.jyrobike.com.

Catch up with last week’s post: How Not To Handle a Public Meltdown

And from my other blog:

 

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A Dad And His Daughter With Disabilities Dance, You May Just Cry

Tuesday, June 24th, 2014

I’ve just watched a video three times in a row, crying continuously. It’s the one of a daddy-daughter dance that’s gone viral. I mean, anytime I see fathers dancing with their girls I get a bit choked up, but this dance is unique. McKenzie Carey, 12, has mitochondrial disease, which depletes her body of energy and keeps her in a wheelchair. Most children diagnosed do not make it past their teens years. The disorder has not stopped McKenzie from entering pageants—more than 100, as Today.com reports. And she’s been doing them with her father, Mike, a truck driver. They’re trying to raise money for her treatments.

Here’s the pair dancing in a pageant earlier this month to the song The Climb; McKenzie will be competing in three more this summer. The one thing Mike Carey does not want: pity. “I always tell people not to be sorry for us,” he’s said. “McKenzie was put on this earth for a purpose. I believe she is an angel. I’m just her spokesperson, I’m just her arms and legs.”

Someone pass me another tissue, please.

From my other blog:

Why my kids’ looks shouldn’t matter

A time-lapse video of a dad’s morning with his baby with special needs

Why we can’t do the morning rush at our house

Image: Screengrab from YouTube video

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How Not To Handle a Public Meltdown

Wednesday, June 18th, 2014

This is a post in the weekly Autism Hopes series by Lisa Quinones-Fontanez, a mom who blogs  over at Atypical Familia.

Being an autism mom can amazing as well as challenging. As a mom, the amazing is easy to handle. I cheer every single moment and milestone because I know how hard my kid works. But the challenging stuff? The stuff that keeps me up at night or the things that make me see red – there’s no hand book for that.  And sometimes my initial instinct isn’t always the best reaction.

It happened in a fast food restaurant. My son, Norrin, and I were sitting at a table waiting for my husband, Joseph, to bring over our food. I handed Norrin his iPad while we waited. We were on vacation, completely out of our routine and it was an unbearably hot day. All Norrin wanted was to return to the hotel pool.  And there was no WiFi connection and Norrin wanted to watch a video on YouTube. All the ingredients for a major meltdown.

I calmly explained to Norrin that we were for Dad to return with our food. We were going to eat and then go back to the hotel. Usually Norrin is fine. He doesn’t need visual cues so long as I tell him what comes next. But the last few days Norrin had been having a hard time. And in that crowded fast food restaurant, my 8 year old son started to cry and scream. I remained calm and tried to comfort him with words, smoothing his hair away from his face. But he didn’t stop. His face was bright red and his nose runny, tears streaming down his face.

That’s when I noticed a table of three men staring at Norrin; their eyes wide open and lips curled in a smirk.

“Is there a problem?” I demanded. And when they shook their heads no, I yelled “Then why are you staring.” I was all New York Latina attitude, neck rolling and hand waving. I glared at them until they looked away and went back to eating.

Joseph had returned with our food and managed to calm Norrin down. Unlike me, Joseph had ignored the men and focused on Norrin.

I’m not usually that bold to confront a table of men. But I had been feeling overwhelmed and my Mama Bear instinct just went into full gear. In retrospect, it was the completely wrong way to handle the situation. What if one of those men did have a problem? Was I truly prepared to take on three men? I cannot put myself or my family in that kind of situation. I may not be able to control how others react to Norrin, but I am in total control of how I react to them.

During a public meltdown, the only person that matters is my kid. I have to tune out everyone else, ignore the stares, the smirks, the finger pointing. While it may not have been my finest parenting moment, it was definitely a lesson learned.

Have you ever confronted a stranger for staring at your special needs child?

Catch up with last week’s post: Six Years Later, I Am Still Learning To Accept Autism

From my other blog:

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Meet The Robot That Could Be Your Child’s Future Butler

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014

Imagine this: Your child wakes up. Because of his physical challenges, he can’t make his own breakfast, but that’s not a problem. Because HERB (Home Exploring Robot Butler) does it for him, setting a kettle of water to boil on the stove, pouring orange juice and then stirring up oatmeal.

HERB has been in development for more than five years at Carnegie Mellon’s Robotics Institute, part of the Quality of Life Technology Center (QofLT). HERB is an exciting advance in the growing field of technology to help people with disabilities with manipulation and mobility. For my son, who has cerebral palsy, reaching up to a kitchen cabinet to get a cup is a near impossible task, ditto for grasping a remote control and pressing buttons. So robots like HERB are his future. As an article for CyberTherapy & Rehabilitation Magazine notes, HERB will provide assistance with meal prep, unpacking and storing groceries, cleaning dishes, light housework and organizing clutter. Down the road, HERB may help with transferring a person with disability from a wheelchair to a seat or helping someone after a fall. This is all accomplished via a range of sensors and advanced computer algorithm programming. You can see HERB in action in this video, along with a different robot in development:

Another robot with a less charming name, PerMMA (Personal Mobility and Manipulation Appliance), has been in the works since 2006 at QofLT. It’s basically a smart powered wheelchair with two dexterous robotic arms. Here’s PerMMA on a shopping trip:

HERB continues to make progress; he’s now figured out how to discover more than 100 home objects including items like foods and plants. Recognizing items based on vision alone in homes, which are filled with countless objects, is a major accomplishment. Not surprisingly, HERB snagged the Most Innovative Technology award at last year’s Robot Film Festival.

These robots aren’t yet available for sale and if they were, they’d most likely cost a bazillion dollars. But it seems very possible that they will inhabit homes in the near future and, as is this case with any new technology, be available (even rentable!) at a reasonable cost. In my son’s 11 years, I’ve already seen his world open up because of technology, thanks to his Proloquo2Go iPad speech app. I’m so, so excited for the assistance the future will bring.

From my other blog:

A thank you to Steve Jobs from a special needs mom

Why we can’t do the morning rush at our house

Max speaks his best sentence ever

 

Image of HERB via Carnegie Mellon’s The Robotics Institute

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