What’s Your Child’s Special Needs Superpower?

Fox has a TV series coming out in March, Touch, about a boy with autism who is able to predict events before they happen. I like it in concept because it’s a TV program about a kid with special needs, which isn’t very common (understatement alert). I don’t like it concept because I’m concerned it’s going to take the focus away from the amazing reality of our kids—something many people still don’t get. And, count on it, some people are going to think kids with autism actually can do this, feeding into the stereotype of savant abilities.

Here’s the trailer:

I haven’t seen the show yet; hopefully, it will show real-life positives about kids with autism. Too many people view our kids as tragedies—children to feel sorry for, and to pity. But as their parents, we know: Our kids have special powers. Not the fantastical kind, like the stuff TV shows and sci-fi books are made of. The kind that enable them to surpass their challenges and make their way in this world.

One of my son’s superpowers is his charm. He has the most amazing ability to win over everyone he meets, even grumpy people. His superpower has made his therapists work extra hard (and even overtime) to help him. It’s gotten his teachers to go the extra mile. It’s made me one very grateful mom. His other superpower is his determination, his willingness to try, try, try again, no matter how hard a task is for him.

What are your child’s superpowers?

From my other blog:

Movies with people who have disabilities

Hello, world, my child is not a tragedy

 

Poster/Fox

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  1. by Angela

    On January 20, 2012 at 9:43 am

    My son has the charm too and a great smile. He also is awesome at “figuring things out” like puzzles, how to get the bananas off the top of the fridge and candy from the cupboard over the washer. I still dont know how he got on top the fridge at the age of 3.

  2. by Tricia

    On January 20, 2012 at 11:00 pm

    It’s all about preemie-power for my guys. Every little moment and milestone is a miracle for my ex-27 weekers.

  3. by Pam Hittie

    On January 21, 2012 at 6:01 am

    My kid has SPD, but woah! The boy is smart. He can read and process information way beyond his classmates. He’s also the most compassionate kid I know. Maybe because he’s so sensitive.

  4. by Twingle Mommy

    On January 23, 2012 at 5:08 pm

    My son’s special power is dertimination! The kid never gives up no matter how hard I push him. I’ve learned a lot from watching him learn how to walk.

  5. by Superhuman | You're the only one like you

    On August 22, 2013 at 3:47 pm

    [...] Is disability in the person or the environment? What if these people just have a different way of looking at the world? They make sense of logic differently. Perhaps they’re as special and different as all of us are (what if “autism” is as valuable and as natural a trait as “creative”?), and we label as though labeling gives us permission to deal with “different” people in a certain way. Categorizing makes us feel safe and keeps everything in a familiar system within which we know how to function, react and interact with each other, maybe even to the point where things fall apart and become chaotic if we don’t. As human as that is, even if we mean well, even if we hold campaigns to “stand up” for them or speak on their behalf, ask for monetary help, flaunt banners against bullying — does that little underlying assumption that we’re “better” than them count as prejudice? Would those actions satisfy as “acceptance”? Our kids have special powers. Not the fantastical kind, like the stuff TV shows and sci-fi books are made of. The kind that enable them to surpass their challenges and make their way in this world. (Ellen Seidman) [...]

  6. by Superhuman | You're the only one like you

    On August 23, 2013 at 8:09 am

    [...] What if “autistic” is as valuable and as natural a trait as “creative”? Someone may need a wheelchair to move around, like someone needs a hearing aid, like I need glasses to see. Someone who is mentally challenged may make sense of the world, of what we understand as logic, differently — the word is light and neutral. I learn that what you seek is what you get. Our kids have special powers. Not the fantastical kind, like the stuff TV shows and sci-fi books are made of. The kind that enable them to surpass their challenges and make their way in this world. (Ellen Seidman) [...]