Posts Tagged ‘ Parental Smoking ’

4 Reasons Why Parents Who Smoke Should Quit

Friday, November 30th, 2012

I’ve been working with colleagues on some new scientific papers focused on parental smoking and the effects on their kids. As we have been reviewing the literature, I decided to summarize why parents who smoke should quit. Here are 4 reasons: 

1) Smoking will compromise the quality of your life and your lifespan. You are putting yourself at high risk for debilitating lung and heart disease and premature death. A recent study suggested that smoking “rots the brain” – meaning your cognitive functioning may decline as you get older as well. So, if you have kids, you are messing with your later years with them – and with your future grandkids. It might not be on your mind right now, but when that time comes, you will have regrets.

2) Smoking puts your kids at risk for health problems. As a society, we all know now the dangers of secondhand smoke. Smoking is prohibited in restaurants, businesses, and public areas for a reason. It’s up to you to prohibit it in the home and protect your child – the number of diseases that they will be prone to are staggering.

3) Parents who smoke have kids who will smoke. The data we are analyzing right now continue to support this finding. Parental smoking is a big risk factor for kids starting to smoke as teens and continuing into adulthood. Your kids will thus be putting themselves at all kinds of health risks in their lifetime as well.

4) When a parent quits smoking, it reduces a kid’s risk to become a smoker. Quitting smoking is not easy. But parents who successfully complete a smoking cessation program greatly reduce the likelihood that their kids will become smokers. So you can protect your kid from starting to smoke by quitting now.

Remember, smoking is the leading preventable cause of major health problems. Why not do what you can to prevent your child from smoking – and improve your own health as well?

Pacifier and Cigarettes via Shutterstock.com

Add a Comment
Back To Red-Hot Parenting