Posts Tagged ‘ educational TV ’

Red-Hot Parenting Recap February 2013: Child-Haters, Genes, Parenting, and Barriers To Services

Thursday, February 28th, 2013

February 2013 was a busy month in the world of parenting – lots of things going on. Here’s a snapshot: 

CHILD-HATERS

The news that an adult male slapped a stranger’s toddler on a plane led to a conversation about how our culture may be breeding, at a minimum, a lack of respect for our youngsters – and at worst, provide a context in which child-hating is tolerated.

GENES

Speaking of conversations, we had many about if we should use what we are learning about genetics to support genetic engineering, including targeting childhood psychiatric disorders. Then came news that new research suggests some genes might predispose to a number of forms of mental illness – but it’s not at all clear that this will move us closer to genetic solutions.

PARENTING

We always include applications of current research to help guide us decide on good parenting strategies. One study suggest how important it is to let your toddler – and not you – be the “boss” when you are playing. And compelling research showed how the simple act of turning off violent shows and replacing them with educational content – without limiting the amount of TV watched – is beneficial for kids.

BARRIERS TO SERVICES

We took on some key barriers to getting kids mental health services and broke them down in understandable turns. Now we all wait to see if sequestration is going to provide the biggest barrier of all.

Time For Review via Shutterstock.com

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Replace Violence With Education: Just Change The Channel Your Toddler Is Watching

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

We always hear that we need to limit the amount of TV toddler’s watch. That’s true. But a new study suggests that even without reducing viewing time, changing the content can have beneficial effects on social development. 

The study was straightforward. One group of parents was trained to replace shows that have violent content with shows that model “prosocial” behavior (like Sesame Street). Another group of parents received no instructions. Nothing was done about the amount of TV watched by the kids.

The results were also straightforward. The kids who watched more prosocial content had less aggression and better social behavior, even one year later. And this result was independent of the amount of TV watched – which didn’t seem to matter.

So, here’s a simple thing parents can do to help prevent aggression and promote prosocial behavior in their toddlers – control the content. Common sense? Sure. But it’s common sense supported by research, which is the best combination of all. And all it takes is parental control of the remote.

TV remote via Shutterstock.com

 

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