Making Screen Time QUALITY Time

As screen time increases for both parents and kids, we often talk about how to reduce it. But is this focus misplaced and unrealistic in today’s society? Today Golnar Khosrowshahi of GoGoNews offers her perspective on how the quality of screen time may be a more forward looking way of approaching the issue. 

The Louvre Museum in Paris recently unveiled Nintendo hand held consoles as their interactive device of choice for visitors to navigate the museum and learn more about selected works of art. While the innovation is fantastic and it delivers substantive nuggets of information to the museum goer, it also partially transforms what was previously an interactive experience with the art and other visitors into an interactive experience between man and machine. In support of the device however, I would argue that providing easier access to better information results in an enlightened individual and altogether, more productive time spent under Pei’s pyramid.

When I was growing up, the popular trend in helicopter parenting was to limit children’s exposure to television. Today’s generation has a more generic limitation in that many parents want to limit ‘screen time’. It is undeniable that children are consuming a variety of content be it video games, television shows or music videos through a variety of screens be it television, smartphones, tablets or computers. However, it cannot all be that bad with the wealth of educational content that is distributed through these very same screens. Should parents be counting and thus limiting those ‘good’ screen hours together with the ‘bad’ screen hours? Many parents’ aversion to long hours spent in front of the screen is prompted by the misconception that these have to be solitary hours. Why not turn this time spent together looking at interesting websites and using the content as a platform for further discussion?

I often question my personal indifference to my children’s time spent between their desktop and tablet computers. Instead of encouraging them to power down, I am exchanging notes with them on the latest and greatest Apps, getting into drawing competitions with them with interactive games such as Draw Something and when not in their company, gifting them books I think they would enjoy to their e-reader accounts. I know, however, that I would start limiting their screen time if all they were doing was watching mindless teeny bopper comedies. But because they are either reading, drawing, or even playing games that hone their fine motor skills, I not only have absolutely no problem with the screen time, in fact I actually encourage it.

I believe that we can all benefit from the ease and access that children have to information in today’s world. For my children, the additional exposure and cross platform access is making them read in great quantity across a variety of subjects. Experiences such as a visit to the museum are of a greater quality because children can learn and understand more than they would have otherwise – all from a screen. So perhaps, our job as parents is not so much to limit screen time, but to ensure screen quality time, and at the end of the day, channel all of these eye opening experiences into dinner table conversations.

Golnar Khosrowshahi is the founder of GoGoNews, a website that publishes up to the minute, age appropriate current events for children. She has also written for The Huffington Post and been featured in many technology and parenting related columns. You can read featured guest blog posts by her here at Red-Hot Parenting the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of every month.

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