Posts Tagged ‘ children’s books ’

The American Academy of Pediatrics Releases New Policy on Reading to Kids During Infancy

Tuesday, June 24th, 2014

Mom reading book to babyFor the first time, the AAP has made an official stand on early literacy, releasing a new policy today that advocates reading aloud to children every day, beginning from birth. The new policy urges pediatricians and policy makers to ensure that books are available to all families, particularly those with low income.

In addition to the announcement, the AAP has also partnered with four organizations, the Clinton Foundation, Too Small to Fail, Scholastic, and Reach Out and Read, to implement the new policy. The AAP and Too Small to Fail are creating a toolkit to include guidelines for parents on the importance of reading from infancy, which will be distributed to 62,000 pediatricians in the AAP network. Scholastic is also donating 50,000 children’s books that Reach Out and Read will distribute to 20,000 medical providers.

The AAP recommends restricting TV time for kids under 2 in favor of interactive play, and reading books can certainly be a part of that. Speaking to the Huffington Post, Pamela High, M.D., the lead author on the AAP early literacy policy, recommends that parents focus on the 5 Rs of early education: read together, rhyme and play with words, set consistent routines, reward with praise, and develop a strong relationship.

Being exposed to books at a young age will also foster early education, help kids prepare for school later in life, and possibly reduce the educational gap between low- and high-income families. There are also several amazing benefits of reading out loud to babies — it strengthens bonding, increases language skills, improves vocabulary, boosts brain activity, and fine-tunes social and emotional recognition — all important things for baby’s development. So grab some board books and start shaping a little bookworm today!

Activity Tips: Mia Reads Book
Activity Tips: Mia Reads Book
Activity Tips: Mia Reads Book

Image: Mother and child reading a book via Shutterstock

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Reading Rainbow’s LeVar Burton Shares Why It’s Important to Read Classic Tales

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

LeVar Burton Reading RainbowEditor’s Note: This post was written by LeVar Burton, co-founder of the award-winning Reading Rainbow digital library, host of the original PBS series, and lifelong children’s literacy advocate. Burton is also known for his distinguished TV roles as the young Kunta Kinte on Roots and Geordi La Forge on Star Trek: The Next Generation. Follow LeVar (@levarburton) and Reading Rainbow (@ReadingRainbow) on Twitter.

People always ask me, “What is your favorite book?” I always give the same answer: “The book that I am reading right now!” From the moment I first cracked the code, it has always been the power of the word made whole in my imagination that has kept me coming back for more.

My first real love in reading was comics. I come from a military family, and for a young American growing up on an Army base in Germany, comics were treasured items from back home. Comics were not only a connective thread to American culture; they were the currency that dominated our social interactions. Every Saturday morning, I would take the box of comics I had finished and was willing to part with, and join the sea of kids on base, trading comics with one another. It was always a thrill getting something brand-new to read, even if the book was already thoroughly used! Science fiction became my genre of choice as a teenager and it still is to this day. Sci-fi invites us to contemplate what I believe are two of the most powerful words in language: what if. It also encouraged me, as a young man faced with the realities of racism, prejudice, and tremendous social upheaval, to imagine a future as I hoped it would become. My reading diet now runs the gamut from biographies to history to mysteries to the occasional Marvel or DC comic title of my youth. It all depends on my mood. It really is the experience of reading that brings me pleasure.

But our kids are not us—and as parents we all know this all too well. The subjects that interest us may not interest them. When our kids are young, the best way I know to encourage them to read is to allow them to pick the subject, the format, and the way in which they experience the written word. Most kids love it when their parents read to them, so I encourage you to read to your children as much as possible. Snuggling up and reading together not only provides comfort and security, but it also emphasizes the value we place on reading. The more your kids see you with a book, the more a message is delivered that reading is an essential part of the human experience. As they become old enough to read themselves, help them find material that is appropriate for their age and reading level, but don’t worry about the subject. Of course we would like them to pick the best literature out there, but that will come with time. For now, trust me, a former comic book addict: If they enjoy reading, they will expand their literary horizons in their own time. If they’re forced to read what doesn’t interest them, you run the risk of extinguishing the spark of excitement for reading that’s so important to their becoming life-long learners and fulfilling their potential.

When you and your child are looking for books to read, sometimes the classics are the best choice of all. There is a reason they are classics—they’ve already stood the test of time. They tend to have familiar themes and they deliver quality life lessons. One of my favorite examples is the story “The Tortoise and the Hare.” It’s believed that Aesop wrote this fable more than 2,500 years ago, and yet it’s hard to find any child today who doesn’t know the story of the hare’s unlikely victory or the timeless lessons of hard work, steadfastness, and the moral that “Slow and steady wins the race.”

So tonight, perhaps you and your child can walk over to the bookshelf, close your eyes, and choose at random what I hope will be, at least in the moment, your favorite book.

Find more household activities that spark your kiddo’s imagination, here.

Watch LeVar read his favorite classic tale, “The Tortoise and the Hare”:

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Children’s Books: Where Are the Black and Latino Characters?

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014

Children's Books CharactersAbout a year ago, many of my friends, along with a certain segment of the Jewish world, were excited about the publication of a new children’s book, an event that is usually so routine it rarely elicits notice, let alone comment. This book, however, was different: The Purim Superhero features a brother and sister who live with their two dads. It is billed as the first Jewish kids’ book to feature same-sex parents or any type of LGBT characters, and was on Parents.com’s recently published list of great children’s books with same-sex parents. (The title refers to a Jewish holiday that, coincidentally, was celebrated earlier this month.)

I recently thought of the book and the enthusiasm it provoked when I read about a study showing just how few newly published children’s books portray characters from racial and ethnic minorities: Of 3,200 books published in 2013 and studied by researchers at the Cooperative Children’s Book Center School of Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison, they found only 93 about black characters; 57 about Latinos; 69 about Asian; and 34 about American Indians.

That amounts to… not a lot.

This is a shame on so many levels. Most obviously, for kids who themselves belong to any of these terribly underrepresented groups—but also for all of us. The problem with these stats is the flip side of the excitement my friends and I felt for The Purim Superhero. The stories that we tell ourselves—and certainly the stories we read to our children—matter. Deeply. They help us understand and make sense of our world, they help us define ourselves and our values, they help us appreciate how others feel and how to put words to our own feelings. It is not just a matter of seeing myself in these stories, it is a matter of seeing my world—and the world I want to live in.

The American family is changing, fundamentally, rapidly. Whatever the world of our parents and grandparents and great-grandparents looked like, today’s world, and certainly tomorrow’s world, will look very different. I want to be able to help my children understand, value, and cherish other people and other families, regardless of what they look like, where they come from, how they worship, or who they love. If the kids’ book world cannot capture in any adequate way the range of racial and ethnic diversity among American families, what hope is there for depictions of newer and less traditional family arrangements?

Books are a big way to help us accomplish that. Without them to aid us, the task is that much harder.

As our values and the realities of our world change over time, so should our books, which can help our kids feel comfortable with and accepting of ideas–and people and family arrangements–that are new, different, and perhaps at first unusual to them. In addition to its two-daddy household, The Purim Superhero features a woman rabbi as the spiritual leader of their synagogue. Depicting a woman in the historically male role of rabbi would have been remarkable a couple of generations ago, and virtually unthinkable before then. Today it is hardly mentioned, if at all, in coverage of and discussions about the book. My kids shrug at it, just as they shrug at the idea of a family with two daddies, and that’s in part thanks to the book they’re asking me to read again and again.

It’s important to note that The Purim Superhero wasn’t created in a vacuum and it wasn’t a happy accident of writer meets publisher. It was the product of a writing contest held by Keshet, an advocacy group for LGBT Jews (the name means “rainbow” in Hebrew)–which saw the contest a great way to find, publish, and publicize an engaging book with the character, themes, and message of so important to the organization.

Perhaps it’s time for others to follow that model. Strangely, the University of Wisconsin-Madison study found that the number of children’s books featuring characters from the groups it studied dropped over the past decade.

We’re going the wrong way. It’s time for our kids’ books to look like America.

Plus: What career will your child have? Find out!

The Lasting Impact of the Early Childhood Years
The Lasting Impact of the Early Childhood Years
The Lasting Impact of the Early Childhood Years

Image of girl reading book via Shutterstock.

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How 2014 Newbery Medal Winner Kate DiCamillo Fell in Love With Reading

Monday, January 27th, 2014

Kate DiCamillo Children's Book AuthorEditor’s Note: Kate DiCamillo is a children’s book author who just won the 2014 Newbery Medal for Flora and Ulysses. She also won the 2004 Newbery Medal for The Tale of Despereux, which was made into an animated film in 2008. Other books include Because of Winn-Dixie (a 2000 Newbery runner-up that was made into a live-action film in 2005) and The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane.

In early January, DiCamillo was named by the Library of Congress as the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, an honor awarded to a new children’s book author every two years. Parents.com reached out to DiCamillo, who wrote the exclusive essay below about her earliest memories on books and reading.

When I was 8 years old, I fell in love with Abraham Lincoln.

What happened was this: I checked out a short biography of Lincoln at the Clermont Elementary School library in Clermont, Florida. The book was one in a Notable Americans series. All the books had red covers, with the name of the notable American in black letters on the spine.

I read the biography of Lincoln once. I read it again, and then I spent several days following my mother around the house telling her about Abraham Lincoln: how he read by firelight, how he was so poor that he actually had fleas, how he would walk miles and miles just to borrow a book or to return one.

I wanted to know more about Lincoln. I wanted to spend more time in his company.

And so my mother took me to the Cooper Memorial Public Library in downtown Clermont. There were biographies of Lincoln there, but they were all too dense and complicated for my second-grade self. The books had photographs, however, so I contented myself with looking at the pictures of the man. I loved his sad and hopeful face.

Then, miracle of miracles, my mother managed to find a book titled Meet Abraham Lincoln. She gave it to me for my ninth birthday. The book was at my reading level, and it had wonderful illustrations. For a long time, I carried Lincoln with me everywhere I went.

The book was a talisman, a promise.

Lincoln’s life spoke to me about the power of books, and the power of kindness and persistence. In an interview recently, someone asked me: Who has influenced you most as a reader? People ask me all the time about who has influenced me as a writer. But I don’t think that anybody has ever asked who has influenced me as a reader.

The question surprised me. It moved me.

“My mother,” I said.

And then I remembered the Lincoln book and started to cry.

My mother passed away in January 2009. She was a single parent and a full-time teacher. I look back now and think: She must have been overwhelmed with all she had to do. She must have been afraid. She must have been worried. But still she listened to me when I talked about Abraham Lincoln. She heard me when I told her I wanted to know more. She found the book I needed to read. And she got it for me.

The right book reminds of us of who we are. It also tells us who we can become. And that is what my mother gave to me.

The Lasting Impact of the Early Childhood Years
The Lasting Impact of the Early Childhood Years
The Lasting Impact of the Early Childhood Years

More Features on Books and Reading

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