Posts Tagged ‘ vitamins ’

Antioxidants, Supplements Not Found to Increase Fertility

Wednesday, August 7th, 2013

Women who take vitamin supplements, including antioxidants in hopes of increasing their chances of conceiving a baby may not experience the boost they are hoping for, according to a major new review of 28 different scientific studies.  More from The Huffington Post:

Women seeking treatment for infertility sometimes take dietary supplements and antioxidants — vitamin C, vitamin E, melatonin, or combination supplements, among others — in the hopes of boosting fertility. But the new Cochrane review, published Sunday, found little evidence supporting efficacy of the supplements.

“I don’t think the results were surprising in the sense that there are no national organizations or guidelines that recommend routine use of antioxidant supplements for fertility,” said Dr. Wendy Vitek, head of the fertility preservation program at the University of Rochester’s Strong Fertility Center, who did not work on the new review.

“But I definitely have women ask me about supplements,” Vitek said. “I think there are a lot of feelings of self-blame with infertility, and women are looking to gain some sense of being proactive and of potentially controlling a very uncontrollable situation.”

Antioxidants, found in many fruits and vegetables, can also be taken in pill form. Antioxidants can help reduce oxidative stress, which occurs when free radicals damage cells and their ability to function. According to background provided in the Cochrane review, oxidative stress can be brought on by many of the same conditions that contribute to infertility, such as ovulatory disorders and endometriosis.

“It is thought that the free radical ‘scavenging’ effects of antioxidants would help to repair any oxidative stress occurring in the female reproductive process,” lead researcher Marian Showell, with the University of Auckland’s department of obstetrics and gynecology, told The Huffington Post. “This has not been disproven by this review. We just didn’t have high enough quality evidence to prove or disprove it.”

All told, the studies included in the review included more than 3,500 women who were attending fertility clinics.

Image: Woman taking vitamins, via Shutterstock

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Many Poor Kids’ Prescriptions Go Unfilled, Study Finds

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

While most parents whose low income qualifies them for health coverage through Medicaid fill prescriptions for antibiotics and other medications for acute illnesses, many fail to fill pediatricians’ orders for vitamin and mineral supplements, a new study has found.  Reuters Health reports:

Antibiotics and other drugs for infections were filled 91 percent of the time, versus 65 percent of prescriptions for vitamins and minerals, for example.

“When your child has an ear infection and is in pain, you have much more of a sense of urgency,” [lead researcher Dr. Rachael] Zweigoron [of the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston] said. But if a doctor recommends a vitamin D or iron supplement, she added, parents might not see the immediate need.

That raises the question of whether parents always know why a pediatrician has prescribed a medication or supplement. “Are we, as pediatricians, doing a good enough job of explaining the importance to parents?” Zweigoron said.

The findings, which appear in the journal Pediatrics, are based on 4,833 kids seen over two years at two clinics connected to Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago.

All of the children were on Medicaid, the government health insurance program for the poor. So it’s not clear if the findings would be the same for U.S. kids with private insurance.

Image: Child taking medicine, via Shutterstock

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Kids’ Vitamin Maker Issuing Refund for False Advertising

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

The children’s vitamin manufacturer NBTY and two of its subsidiaries, Rexall Sundown and NatureSmart are offering refunds to customers after the Federal Trade Commission discovered that the vitamins contain far less of the omega-3 DHA than the package claims.  From CNN:

The vitamins’ packaging featured Disney princesses, Winnie the Pooh, Nemo and Spider-Man. Manufacturer NBTY and two of its subsidiaries, Rexall Sundown and NatureSmart, claimed in product advertising and on packaging that the vitamins contained a dose of DHA that would satisfy 100% of a child’s daily requirement.

But in some cases the vitamins contained only minuscule amounts of DHA, the Federal Trade Commission said.

The amount of DHA — an omega-3 fatty acid found in fish — in Disney and Marvel Complete Tablets equaled only one-thousandth of what the marketers claimed per serving for children age 4 and older.

For smaller children, the discrepancy was even more significant. Only five-10-thousandths of what the company claimed the pills contained on the packaging was in a serving of Disney and Marvel Complete tablets for children ages 2 to 4, court documents filed by the FTC alleged.

The packaging claimed the DHA the vitamins contained would help vision and brain development in children. The FTC said those claims were unsupported.

Sold at CVS Pharmacy, Wal-Mart, Target, Walgreens, Kroger, Kmart, Meijer and Rite Aid, as well as online, the boxes were priced at between $4 and $8 each.

Parents who believe they may have purchased the vitamins dating back to between May 1, 2008, and September 30, 2010, can file a claim through the FTC’s website, anytime before October 12.

Image: Girl taking vitamins, via Shutterstock

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