Posts Tagged ‘ unemployment ’

Census Data Reveals More Stay-at-Home Dads

Tuesday, May 1st, 2012

Nearly a third of American fathers with working wives stay at home at least one day each week to care for children, a new analysis of 2010 U.S. census data has found. Twenty percent of fathers with children under age 5 are the primary child caretakers in their family.

CNNMoney has more:

Not only has it become more necessary for men to pitch in at home, but fathers have also become more available to do so. “It’s a combination of mothers going to work and fathers being out of work as a result of the recession,” said Lynda Laughlin, a family demographer at the Census Bureau.

Men were particularly hard hit by the steep job losses during that time, losing 4 million jobs since 2007, while women lost just over 2 million during the same time period, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Image: Father and baby, via Shutterstock.

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AP: Half of New College Grads Jobless or Underemployed

Monday, April 23rd, 2012

Half of recent college graduates are either unemployed or working at jobs that don’t fully use their skills and knowledge, an analysis of government data by The Associated Press has found. Young adults are, instead of putting their degrees to full use, increasingly parsing together lower-paying jobs in an attempt to keep up with student loan payments and cost of living.  From the AP:

Opportunities for college graduates vary widely.

While there’s strong demand in science, education and health fields, arts and humanities flounder. Median wages for those with bachelor’s degrees are down from 2000, hit by technological changes that are eliminating midlevel jobs such as bank tellers. Most future job openings are projected to be in lower-skilled positions such as home health aides, who can provide personalized attention as the U.S. population ages.

Taking underemployment into consideration, the job prospects for bachelor’s degree holders fell last year to the lowest level in more than a decade.

“I don’t even know what I’m looking for,” says Michael Bledsoe, who described months of fruitless job searches as he served customers at a Seattle coffeehouse. The 23-year-old graduated in 2010 with a creative writing degree.

Image: Graduation caps, via Shutterstock

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Census Data: Fathers Becoming More Involved in Child Care

Wednesday, December 7th, 2011

In families where mothers are in the workforce, 32 percent of fathers are regular sources of child care, and one in five fathers are the primary source of child care, a new study released by the Census Bureau has found.  The report, a series of tables called “Who’s Minding the Kids? Child Care Arrangements: Spring 2010,” tracked a typical week, during which 61 percent of all American children under age 5 had some kind of child care arrangement.

The changing economy accounts for some of the heightened involvement of fathers, researchers say.

“A recession may force families to adjust their child care arrangements, “ Lynda Laughlin, a family demographer at the Census Bureau, said in a statement. “It can trigger unemployment or changes in work hours, thus increasing the availability of fathers to provide child care. It also can reduce available income to pay for child care outside of the home.”

Other highlights from the report include:

  • In households with working moms, family members continue to serve as an important source of child care for preschoolers. In spring of 2010, 30 percent of preschoolers were regularly cared for by their grandparents, 29 percent were cared for by their fathers, and 12 percent received care from a sibling or other relative.
  • Preschoolers with employed black and Hispanic mothers were more likely to be cared for by their grandparents than their fathers. Twenty-nine percent of black preschoolers were cared for by their grandparents, while a quarter (22 percent) were cared for by their fathers. A third of Hispanic preschoolers were regularly taken care of by their grandparent, compared with 29 percent who received care from their fathers.
  • Among preschoolers of employed non-Hispanic white mothers, 30 percent were cared for by their fathers and 29 percent were cared for by their grandparents.
  • Of the 21 million mothers who were employed in the spring of 2010, one-third reported they paid for child care for at least one of their children.
  • Families with an employed mother and children younger than 15 paid an average of $138 per week for child care in 2010, up from $81 in 1985 (in constant 2010 dollars), the first year that these data were collected.

Image: Father playing with his child, via Shutterstock.

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