Posts Tagged ‘ Tylenol ’

Aceitaminophen in Pregnancy May Be Linked to ADHD in Kids

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

Women who take the over-the-counter medication aceitaminophen during pregnancy may have babies with a greater risk of being diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) later in childhood, a new study has found.  More from The Huffington Post:

The findings, published in JAMA Pediatrics on Monday, are preliminary and do not establish cause and effect. However, they do intensify questions about the risks and benefits of taking the medication while pregnant.

Aspirin and ibuprofen — nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs — are generally not recommended as pain relievers for pregnant women, particularly during the last three months. Acetaminophen-based medications such as Tylenol, however, have generally been thought to be safe, and estimates suggest that more than 50 percent of women in the United States take acetaminophen at some point while pregnant.

“It is important we follow up [on] the potential health risks that acetaminophen may cause,” Zeyan Liew, a Ph.D. candidate with the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and an author on the study, told The Huffington Post. “ADHD incidence has been noticed to be increased in the last decades, and we are interested in searching for avoidable environmental factors that may contribute to the trend.”

Liew and his co-authors looked at data on more than 64,000 women and their children taken from the Danish National Birth Cohort. They found that children whose mothers took acetaminophen while pregnant had a 13 percent to 37 percent greater risk of later being diagnosed with hyperkinetic disorder (which is similar to ADHD, but uses different diagnostic criteria), taking medications for ADHD, or displaying ADHD-like behaviors at age 7.

That link was stronger among women who took acetaminophen in multiple trimesters or who used it more frequently. For example, the risk of behavioral issues was elevated by 50 percent or more in children whose mothers took the pain reliever for more than 20 weeks while pregnant.

Image: Pregnant woman, via Shutterstock

Add a Comment
Back To Parents News Now

Frequent Tylenol Use in Pregnancy May Carry Risks

Monday, November 25th, 2013

Pregnant women who take Tylenol or over-the-counter pain-relieving medications that contain acetaminophen may be putting their babies at higher risk of developing language issues or behavioral problems, a new study conducted in Norway has found.  More from NBC News:

The new study is the first to look at young children whose mothers took Tylenol while pregnant.

“Our findings suggest that (acetaminophen) might not be as harmless as we think,” Ragnhild Eek Brandlistuen said. She led the study at the School of Pharmacy at the University of Oslo in Norway.

She and her co-authors studied 48,000 Norwegian children whose mothers answered survey questions about their medication use at weeks 17 and 30 of pregnancy, and again six months after giving birth.

Mothers filled out a follow-up questionnaire about their child’s developmental milestones three years later.

Close to 4 percent of women took Tylenol for at least 28 days total during pregnancy.

Their children seemed to have poorer motor skills than kids whose mothers had taken the drug fewer times or not at all. Tylenol-exposed kids also tended to start walking later, have poorer communication and language skills and more behavior problems.

It’s difficult to define risks for pregnant women and their children, since rigorous tests and controlled studies of drug exposure aren’t ethical, Brandlistuen said. All researchers can do is closely observe women in the real world.

But this study, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, involved a large number of women, and researchers also looked for any link to ibuprofen, a pain-relief alternative without acetaminophen.

They found no development problems tied to ibuprofen.

“Long-term use of (acetaminophen) increased the risk of behavior problems by 70 percent at age three,” Brandlistuen said. “That is considerable.”

Heavy users most often reported taking the drug for five to seven days in a row a few times during pregnancy, she said.

Image: Pregnant woman taking medication, via Shuttestock

Add a Comment
Back To Parents News Now

Research Links Acetaminophen to Asthma in Children

Tuesday, December 20th, 2011

A review of more than 20 scientific studies conducted over the past decade has led researchers to recommend that children who have asthma or have risk factors for the disease not be given acetaminophen, a common pain reliever and fever reducer, The New York Times reports.  Dr. John T. McBride, a pediatrician at Akron Children’s Hospital in Ohio, has led the latest study and asserts that the rise in acetaminophen use (which happened in the 1980s amid fears that aspirin can cause Reye’s syndrome in children) can be linked to the sharp increase in asthma diagnoses in the past decades.  From the Times:

Dr. McBride based his assertion on several lines of evidence. In addition to the timing of the asthma epidemic, he said, there is now a plausible explanation for how acetaminophen might provoke or worsen asthma, a chronic inflammatory condition of the lungs. Even a single dose of acetaminophen can reduce the body’s levels of glutathione, an enzyme that helps repair oxidative damage that can drive inflammation in the airways, researchers have found.

“Almost every study that’s looked for it has found a dose-response relationship between acetaminophen use and asthma,” Dr. McBride said. “The association is incredibly consistent across age, geography and culture.”

A statistical link between acetaminophen and asthma has turned up in studies of infants, children and adults. Studies have also found an increased risk of asthma in children whose mothers who took acetaminophen during pregnancy.

Image: Asthma inhaler, via Shutterstock.

Add a Comment
Back To Parents News Now

Tylenol Recall Does Not Affect Children’s Products

Wednesday, June 29th, 2011

McNeil Consumer Healthcare, a unit of Johnson & Johnson, has announced a recall of 718,000 bottles of Tylenol, Sudafed, and Benadryl products.  One lot (34,000 bottles) of eight-hour extended release Tylenol caplets was found to have a “musty or moldy odor” that might upset the stomachs of some consumers.

Concerned parents should note that none of the products on the new list–some of which were partially recalled at the wholesale level in January–are marketed as children’s products.  But in May, Johnson & Johnson and other companies announced an overhaul of the way they make concentrated liquid drops of children’s pain and fever medications that contain acetaminophen.  Shortly thereafter, the FDA voted to revamp the way infant medications are labeled and dosed.

Click here for a complete list of products that are part of today’s Tylenol recall.

Add a Comment
Back To Parents News Now