Posts Tagged ‘ sports ’

After Concussion, Kids Should Delay Return to School, AAP Advises

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013

The American Academy of Pediatrics is recommending that kids who suffer a concussion, a common sports-related injury, shouldn’t return to school right away, lest they exacerbate the temporary symptoms of concussion that relate to learning and retaining information.  More from Time.com:

Although children may appear to be physically normal after having a concussion, they may actually have trouble learning new information and retaining it. Going back to school may exacerbate these symptoms, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in a new clinical report presented at the AAP National Conference & Exhibition in Orlando.

Research shows that it takes about three weeks for a child to fully recover from a concussion. If their symptoms are especially severe, they should stay home from school. Even though kids with concussions may appear asymptomatic, they often report difficulty focusing on schoolwork and taking tests, especially in math, science, and foreign-languages. Medical experts are worried that too much learning stimulation can overwhelm a brain that is still recovering, and make it even more difficult for a child to get back on track. If systems are mild, parents can consider sending their kids back to class, but should inform teachers about the concussion so adjustments can be made to the pace of the class if needed. The researchers call this necessary step, “cognitive rest.”
New guidelines were issued this year by the American Academy of Neurology recommending that kids and teens who suffer concussions should sit out at sports practices and games until they have been cleared by a medical professional.
Image: Boy in football uniform, via Shutterstock
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Boys, Girls May Have Different Obesity Risk Factors

Thursday, August 15th, 2013

Though certain lifestyle habits, including watching television and eating school lunches, are linked with childhood obesity, sixth grade girls and boys also face some gender-specific risk factors.  Reuters reports:

Involvement in sports, for example, was tied to a lower risk of obesity in boys but not girls and drinking milk was linked to lowered risk among girls but not boys, according to researchers from the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor.

The study’s authors, led by Dr. Elizabeth Jackson, write in the journal Pediatrics that understanding obesity risk factors for specific genders may help target programs aimed at weight loss or preventing weight gain in children.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that about 17 percent of children and teens are obese.

For the new study, Jackson and her colleagues used data collected between 2004 and 2011 from 1,714 sixth-grade students at 20 middle schools in and around Ann Arbor.

Overall, about 18 percent of boys and 16 percent of girls were obese, which is defined as children who are in the top-fifth percentile of body mass index – a measurement of weight in relation to height.

Among boys who were not obese, about 56 percent participated in at least 20 minutes of vigorous physical activity at least five times per week, compared to about 43 percent of boys who were obese.

But there was no difference between the percentage of obese and non-obese girls who reported regular vigorous physical activity.

Playing on at least one sports team was also linked to decreased risk of obesity for boys but not girls.

The lack of an association between obesity and physical activity in girls may be explained by girls not reporting some activities like cheerleading or dance, because children may not consider those activities sports, the researchers write.

They did find, however, that drinking two or more servings of milk per day was tied to about a 20 percent decreased risk of obesity among girls but not boys. One possible explanation is that milk is displacing sugary drinks in the girls’ diets, Jackson’s team writes.

Image: Overweight girl, via Shutterstock

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Kids Suffer Sports Injuries Every 25 Seconds

Friday, August 9th, 2013

Young athletes suffer injuries–mostly strains, sprains, and fractures–about once every 25 seconds, resulting in around 1.35 million emergency room visits each year, according to a study by the organization Safe Kids Worldwide. Sports injuries, the group found, account for 20 percent of all ER visits by children. More from CBS News:

“We uncovered some surprising and disturbing data about how often our kids are being injured playing sports,” Kate Carr, president and CEO of Safe Kids Worldwide, said in a statement.

For the new report, researchers from the child injury awareness organization looked at emergency room data collected in 2011 on injuries related to the top 14 sports for kids, including basketball, soccer, baseball, softball, cheerleading and ice hockey.

The most common injuries were strains and sprains, followed by fractures, bruises and scrapes.

Especially concerning though were the researchers found about 163,000 of those ER visits — or 12 percent — were for concussions. That’s about one child concussed every three minutes, Safe Kids points out. Nearly half of the concussions (47 percent) occurred in children between 12 and 15 years old, a “disturbing” trend because younger children take longer to recover from concussions than older ones. Serious and potentially deadly brain swelling is also more common in young people with traumatic brain injuries than adults, the report added.

In March, the American Academy of Neurology issued new guidelines recommending that kids sit out of games after suffering a concussion until they have been cleared by a doctor.

Image: Boy playing football, via Shutterstock

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New Way Found to Measure Football-Related Head Injuries

Tuesday, July 23rd, 2013

The cumulative effect of repeated tackles and other head hits in football could now be measurable with a new method developed by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.  More from ScienceDaily.com:

The metric, called Risk Weighted Cumulative Exposure (RWE), can capture players’ exposure to the risk of concussion over the course of a football season by measuring the frequency and magnitude of all impacts, said senior author of the study Joel Stitzel, Ph.D., chair of biomedical engineering at Wake Forest Baptist and associate head of the Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences.

The study is published in the current online edition of the Annals of Biomedical Engineering.

Based on data gathered throughout a season of high school football games and practices, the researchers used RWE to measure the cumulative risk of injury due to linear and rotational acceleration separately, as well as the combined probability of injury associated with both.

“This metric gives us a way to look at a large number of players and the hits they’ve incurred while playing football,” Stitzel said. “We know that young players are constantly experiencing low-level hits that don’t cause visible injury, but there hasn’t been a good way to measure the associated risk of concussion.”

Concussion is the most common sports-related head injury, with football players having the highest rate among high school athletes, according to the study. It is estimated that nearly 1.1 million students play high school football in the United States.

Image: Football player, via Shutterstock

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Health Concerns for Young Athletes More Than Just Concussions

Monday, May 13th, 2013

The number one killer of young athletes is not concussion- or head injury-related, a group of youth sports safety advocates announced at a recent conference in Washington, DC.  Instead, sudden cardiac arrest, typically brought on by a pre-existing, detectable condition that could have been treated, is the culprit in most sports-related deaths. Another lethal threat is heat stroke, which is considered to be completely preventable.  The New York Times reports on the findings, and how safety advocates are trying to raise awareness of these risks:

Concussions are receiving attention nationwide, but death from a blow to the head is exceedingly rare. In contrast, a young athlete dies from a cardiac incident once every three days in the United States, researchers say. In hot months like August, heat stroke often causes the death of a young athlete every other day on average.

“Concussion victims almost always get a second chance,” said Laura Friend, an attendee at the Washington summit whose 12-year-old daughter, Sarah, died of sudden cardiac arrest while swimming at a Texas community pool in 2004. “When your heart fails from something that could have been treated — which happens all the time — you don’t have another chance. As someone told me, sudden cardiac arrest is not rare; surviving it is.”

Heat stroke, also known as exertional heat illness, has been a focus of sports safety advocates because of simple, common-sense preventive measures, like introducing gradual levels of exercise at the beginning of a sports season in hot temperatures.

“When my son died, people treated it as a freak thing,” said Rhonda Fincher, whose 13-year-old son, Kendrick, died in 1995 from heat stroke sustained during a season-opening football practice in northwestern Arkansas. “The ignorance was unacceptable because, unfortunately, it is not infrequent. And we should all know that.

“No healthy child should be sent off to a routine practice and die from it.”

Leaders of youth sports acknowledge that concussions have long been overlooked and that the injury deserves a period of heightened awareness, especially because of the potential for long-term consequences. But as the focus of the February conference organized by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association suggests, there is a mounting worry that more hazardous health concerns are being disregarded because of the intense emphasis on brain injuries.

A sudden heart-related death is “so incredibly tragic and stunning that people aren’t comfortable putting it into the everyday conversation,” said Dr. Jonathan Drezner, the president of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine.

“I do wish, to some extent, it was something people talked more about,” Drezner added, “because we are getting to a place where we could prevent many of these deaths.”

Image: Girl with soccer ball, via Shutterstock

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