Posts Tagged ‘ self-esteem ’

Anti-Bullying Curriculum Shows Results at Elementary, Middle Schools

Wednesday, January 29th, 2014

An anti-bullying curriculum that was tested at three elementary and middle schools in Illinois has shown promising results, including reported improvements in key areas including respect, positive communication and social behaviors, awareness and understanding of bullying, school climate, and self-esteem.  More from ScienceDaily.com:

“It’s just as important to teach empathy to students as it is to teach them science,” says Jennifer E. Beebe, assistant professor of counseling and human services at Canisius College. “We can increase consciousness of positive behaviors by incorporating those ideals into the educational system. Many students may not learn them otherwise.”

Beebe completed a study which involved disrespect, bullying behaviors and physical aggression with 300 elementary and middle school students in three schools in Illinois. The behaviors were negatively impacting students’ academic achievement and school attendance. In many cases, these behaviors crossed over into the cyber world. Beebe’s research was sponsored by a grant from The Canisius College School of Education and Human Services.

Students learned several tenets from martial arts during a 12-week long mentoring program which was integrated into students’ regular classroom lessons for approximately one hour. “Students were taught such concepts as loyalty, obedience and respect.” Beebe adds.

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Back to School: Dealing With Meanness and Bullying
Back to School: Dealing With Meanness and Bullying
Back to School: Dealing With Meanness and Bullying

Image: Classroom, via Shutterstock

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Nearly 1/3 of Moms ‘Hate Their Bodies,’ Survey Finds

Thursday, February 14th, 2013

A survey of more than 3,000 mothers conducted by The Today Show has revealed that 31 percent of moms use the word “hate” in describing their body image.  The survey was conducted online, and is not a scientific finding, but it is an interesting window into how mothers see themselves and their bodies.  More from Today.com:

Almost two-thirds of women say they worry their partner doesn’t like their body, according to our online, unscientific poll. Two-thirds of moms also say images of Hollywood moms looking super-fit after having a baby make them feel worse about themselves.

“We live in a culture of judgment, and a culture that really expects women to be perfect and have perfect bodies no matter what else you have going on in your life,” says Michelle Noehren, creator of the CT Working Moms blog and the mom of a toddler who bared her not-so-perfect tummy in a moms’ photoshoot that went viral last year. As the heaviest member of the group, she got grateful responses from many women – but she also bore the brunt of nasty criticism.

Some days, she’s her own worst critic.

“I think to myself, ‘I still can’t fit into any of the clothes that I had before pregnancy’,” she said. “Sometimes I just wish I could put those pants on and wear them to work and feel comfortable again. My husband tells me I’m beautiful all the time, but sometimes I worry that I’m not as attractive to him as I used to be.”

Image: Woman looking in mirror, via Shutterstock

 

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Hallmark UK Apologizes After Offensive Card Discovered

Tuesday, December 11th, 2012

A greeting card discovered by an American writer traveling in the United Kingdom had mothers–particularly mothers of girls–up in arms, prompting Hallmark to issue an apology. The card read, according to The Huffington Post, “You’re 13 today! If you had a rich boyfriend he’d give you diamonds and rubies. Well, maybe next year you will – when you’ve bigger boobies!”

After a Twitter photo and comment about the card generated massive social media buzz, Hallmark UK issued a statement that read:

This card was produced by Creative Publishing prior to Hallmark Cards acquiring the company in 1998. We are as surprised and horrified as anyone else to have discovered that there are still copies in circulation. The card has not been produced for over 15 years and would never pass our own strict guidelines of taste and appropriateness. We would like to assure all our customers that we will do everything in our power to track down remaining copies.

Image: Surprised woman holding greeting card, via Shutterstock

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Study: TV Time Hurts Self-Esteem, But Not for White Boys

Thursday, May 31st, 2012

The amount of time children spend in front of television screens, their self-esteem is affected…unless the child is a white male.  These are the findings of a new study published in the journal Communication Research by Nicole Martins, an assistant professor of telecommunications at Indiana University, and Kristen Harrison, professor of communication studies at the University of Michigan.

Martins and Harrison surveyed 400 pre-adolescent children of different races in the Midwest over the period of a year.  From a release announcing their findings:

“Regardless of what show you’re watching, if you’re a white male, things in life are pretty good for you,” Martins said of characters on TV. “You tend to be in positions of power, you have prestigious occupations, high education, glamorous houses, a beautiful wife, with very little portrayals of how hard you worked to get there.

“If you are a girl or a woman, what you see is that women on television are not given a variety of roles,” she added. “The roles that they see are pretty simplistic; they’re almost always one-dimensional and focused on the success they have because of how they look, not what they do or what they think or how they got there.

“This sexualization of women presumably leads to this negative impact on girls.”

With regard to black boys, they are often criminalized in many programs, shown as hoodlums and buffoons, and without much variety in the kinds of roles they occupy.

“Young black boys are getting the opposite message: that there is not lots of good things that you can aspire to,” Martins said. “If we think about those kinds of messages, that’s what’s responsible for the impact.

“If we think just about the sheer amount of time they’re spending, and not the messages, these kids are spending so much time with the media that they’re not given a chance to explore other things they’re good at, that could boost their self-esteem.”

Martins said their study counters claims by producers that programs have been progressive in their depictions of under-represented populations. An earlier study co-authored by her and Harrison suggests that video games “are the worst offenders when it comes to representation of ethnicity and gender.”

Image: Boy watching television, via Shutterstock.

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“Pretty” Girls T-Shirt Sparks Outrage

Friday, September 2nd, 2011

jcpennyshirtA T-shirt for girls sold by JC Penney caused an online uproar this week for its message suggesting that pretty girls don’t do homework.

Sold in sizes 7 to 16, the shirt said, “I’m too pretty to do homework, so my brother has to do it for me.” The description of the shirt read: “Who has time for homework when there’s a new Justin Bieber album out? She’ll love this tee that’s just as cute and sassy as she is.”

But many bloggers and others saw the shirt as anything but cute, decrying what they viewed as an unhealthy message for young girls.

“I have three bright, funny nieces who are 7, 5 and 5 and I never want them to believe the message on this shirt is true,” Jessica Wakeman wrote on TheFrisky.com. “Its sale price ($9.99 down from the original $16.99) seems to indicate that people may be too smart to buy into such girl-undermining messaging,” Jen Doll wrote on The Village Voice blog. Jenna Sauers on Jezebel.com said that the tee “explicitly associates intelligence with being a boy, and looking pretty with being a girl.” An online petition demanding that JC Penney stop selling the shirt quickly gathered more than a thousand signatures.

JCPenney reacted within hours of the first complaints Wednesday, removing the shirt from its website, and issuing a statement. From The Village Voice:

J.C. Penney is committed to being America’s destination for great style and great value for the whole family. We agree that the “Too pretty” t-shirt does not deliver an appropriate message, and we have immediately discontinued its sale. Our merchandise is intended to appeal to a broad customer base, not to offend them. We would like to apologize to our customers and are taking action to ensure that we continue to uphold the integrity of our merchandise that they have come to expect.

Kate Coultas, spokeswoman for JC Penney, told The Voice:

“One of the reasons we’re so outraged is that this is not what we stand for. We’ve facilitated over $100 million [in donations] over the past 10 years to support after-school programs in local communities. That’s a key important message for us.”

What do you think of the T-shirt? Would you let your daughter wear it?

(image via: http://www.thefrisky.com)

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