Posts Tagged ‘ Safety ’

Bounce House Accident Raises Safety Concerns

Monday, May 19th, 2014

An accident that happened last week in upstate New York when an inflatable “bounce house” apparently blew off its safety stakes and flew up to 20 feet in the air with children still inside has bounce house manufacturers and parents alike thinking more carefully about the safety of the houses, particularly small ones that are privately owned and operated.

According to news reports, two children were seriously injured in the May 13 accident: a 5- and a 6-year-old boy were carried as far as 15 to 20 feet into the air before they fell out of the house, and were both sent to Albany Medical Center. The 5-year-old boy was subsequently put into a medically induced coma to treat the serious head injuries he sustained when he landing on a parked car.  The 6-year-old broke both arms, jaw, and eye socket, and ruptured his spleen when he landed in a parking lot.

The Weather Channel reports that despite repeated mentions of a “violent” wind gust that caused the accident, there were no discernible  gusts on the day of the accident:

“Winds were light at the Glens Falls reporting station at the reported time of the incident,” said Stu Ostro, senior meteorologist at The Weather Channel. Ostro says winds were only between 5 and 10 mph.

Police tell weather.com that the bounce house was rather small — not the professional-sized ones you’d see at fairs and amusement parks.

The bounce house manufacturer, Little Tikes, said they would investigate the cause of the incident, NBC News reports.

“Providing safe and wholesome play experiences is of utmost importance to Little Tikes. We are looking into what happened in South Glen Falls Monday,” Jennifer Campana, Director PR & Social Media, MGA Entertainment, the parent company of Little Tikes, told NBC News. “In the meantime, our thoughts and prayers are with the children and their families.”

A study published in 2012 by the Nationwide Children’s Hospital found as many as 30 kids a day were treated in emergency rooms for injuries associated with inflatable bouncers.

Just last week, Jefferson County Public Schools in Louisville, Kentucky, banned bouncers on school property, WAVE-TV reports.

Organize the perfect birthday party for your little one’s big day using our Birthday Party Planner!

Manners & Responsibility: Kids at Parties
Manners & Responsibility: Kids at Parties
Manners & Responsibility: Kids at Parties

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Survey Reveals Parents’ Online Safety Attitudes

Monday, April 7th, 2014

More than three quarters of American parents discuss online safety with their children, according to a new national survey, which is a reassuring finding given that the same survey found that 95 percent of 12-15 year-olds own at least one smartphone, tablet, or other web-connected device.  More details of the survey, which was compiled by the commerce website eBuyer.com, were published on Mashable:

  • 83 percent of parents surveyed trust their children to use the Internet safely
  • 12-15 year-olds have an average of 78 Facebook friends they’ve never met in real life
  • Kids in the same age demographic send an average of 255 text messages each week
  • 64 percent of kids report having had a negative experience online, but only 22 percent of parents report that their kids have had a negative experience
  • 57 percent of kids have accidentally accessed inappropriate material online

Image: Kids playing with smartphones, via Shutterstock

Mom Confessions: Parenting Rules I Thought I'd Keep
Mom Confessions: Parenting Rules I Thought I'd Keep
Mom Confessions: Parenting Rules I Thought I'd Keep

These activities will keep your kiddos occupied without using any screen time.

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Boy Returns to School After Lightning Strike

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

Less than a year after being struck by lightning and sustaining a serious brain injury, an Ohio boy is starting to integrate back into his school.  ABC News reports:

Ethan Kadish was simply enjoying a summer day when he suffered a devastating injury. Kadish and two other children were struck by lightning as they played Frisbee at a summer camp last June. Ethan’s heart temporarily stopped, leaving his brain deprived of vitally needed oxygenated blood.

As a result of the oxygen deprivation, Ethan suffered a hypoxic brain injury, which has left him unable to walk or talk. He spent five months in the hospital, and a gastrointestinal perforation put him back in the hospital just 10 days after he was released.

In spite of these setbacks, earlier this month Ethan returned to school, less than a year after his initial injury.

Now in a wheelchair and with a nurse, Kadish is able to attend classes at his middle school three days a week. He cannot talk, but works with teachers in the special education classroom. His mother Alexia Kadish, of Loveland, Ohio., said after just a few weeks at school they have already seen a difference in Ethan.

“It’s been more amazing than we could have imagined,” Kadish said. “We initially thought any sort of schooling would be homebound initially.”

Kadish said Ethan has been sleeping better on days when he’s at school. Ethan also gets visits from his old friends when he’s at school.

Even his younger sister will sometimes walk over from her fifth grade class room to visit him.

Kadish said Ethan’s road to recovery will be a long process and even doctors don’t know exactly how much his brain will recover from the injury. The eighth grader, who loved sports and musicals, no longer speaks but he has started laughing again.

“He laughs a lot. He even accesses the sad side … it’s more a of a pouting cry,” Kadish said. “He’s accessing the emotional areas of his brain. We’re hopeful that it indicates that he’s becoming more present.”

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Car Seats Remain Dangerously Underused, Study Finds

Monday, February 10th, 2014

A third of children who died in car accidents in 2011 were not properly restrained in car seats or age-appropriate boosters or buckles, a new study published in the Morbility and Mortality Weekly Report has found.  The New York Times has more:

More than 9,000 children under 12 died in motor vehicle accidents from 2002 to 2011, in many cases because they were not properly restrained in child seats or seatbelts.

Though the death rate decreased over those years, to 1.2 per 100,000 children in 2011 from 2.2 in 2002, seatbelts would have saved many more lives, according to a study published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

In 2011, 33 percent of children who died in motor vehicle accidents were not buckled in. While only 2 percent of children under age 1 rode unrestrained, 22 percent of those in that age group who died were unbuckled. An estimated 3,308 children under 4 are alive today because they were properly buckled in.

In 2009-10, there were no differences in death rates by age or sex, but black children had a death rate about 46 percent higher than Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites.

Another recent study also found that car seat safety practices differ among racial and ethnic groups, and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recently announced new safety standards that would protect children in side-impact crashes, a common scenario for car accidents involving children.

Wondering if your car seat is appropriate and safe for your child?  Check out Parents.com’s 6 smart car seat safety rulesOr click here for the American Academy of Pediatrics’ guidelines on car safety for newborns through 13-year-olds.

How is your child’s growth and development compared to others the same age? Check our growth chart to help estimate her percentiles.

Avoid a Car-Seat Mistake
Avoid a Car-Seat Mistake
Avoid a Car-Seat Mistake

Image: Child in a car seat, via Shutterstock

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Government Will Pay for GPS Devices for Autistic Kids

Friday, January 31st, 2014

The U.S. Justice Department has agreed to fund a program that would provide voluntary GPS tracking devices to children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. The hope of the program, and legislation sponsored by New York Senator Charles Schumer, is the prevention of incidents in which autistic kids wander away from caregivers and are unable to communicate their way back to safety.

Schumer told The New York Times that the voluntary-use GPS tracking devices, which cost about $85 each plus small monthly fees, will be like those used to track people suffering from Alzheimer’s. The Justice Department already provides grants to help pay for Alzheimer’s patients’ devices.

More from NY1 News:

It comes on the heels of the disappearance and death of Avonte Oquendo.

The 14-year-old, who suffered from autism, exited his school in October.

His remains were found in the East River earlier this month.

Schumer pushed for legislation to provide GPS tracking devices for children with autism and other conditions, in which they tend to wander off from caregivers or parents.

The Justice Department has agreed to use grant funds to pay for the voluntary devices.

The news comes as new video surfaces of Avonte leaving his Long Island City school through a door that had been left ajar by someone exiting the school.

According to the Oquendo family attorney, it was left open for about a half hour before being closed by a school safety agent.

What career will your child have? Take our quiz to find out!

Early Signs of Autism
Early Signs of Autism
Early Signs of Autism

Image: School door, via Shutterstock

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