Posts Tagged ‘ report card ’

12th Graders Continue to Lag in Reading, Math

Thursday, May 8th, 2014

The National Assessment of Educational Progress, an assessment that’s also called “the nation’s report card,” shows disappointing trends in the performance of American 12th graders in both math and reading skill levels.  NPR has more:

It measured reading and math skills of 92,000 high school seniors in 2013 and found that reading skills of those 12th-graders have gone unchanged since the last time the test was given, in 2009, and they’re lower than those of students in 1992.

Things aren’t much better when it comes to math. While scores were slightly better than in 2005, they too have been stagnant since 2009.

Those results are unacceptable, said David Driscoll, chairman of the National Assessment Governing Board, which oversees testing policy.

“Achievement at this very critical point in a student’s life must be improved to ensure success after high school,” he said.

Education Secretary Arne Duncan called the news troubling, particularly as high school graduation rates have reached an all-time high.

“We must reject educational stagnation in our high schools, and as a nation, we must do better for all students, especially for African-American and Latino students,” he said.

In the NAEP test, achievement is broken down into three levels: basic, proficient and advanced. “Basic” indicates partial mastery of the subject, “proficient” is grade-level performance, and “advanced” indicates superior work.

Seventy-four percent of students scored below the grade-appropriate level in math, compared with 26 percent of students who scored at or above grade level. Asian students and students whose parents went to college achieved the best math scores. Math scores for African-American students were the worst.

In reading, just 38 percent of seniors scored at or above grade level. And one-quarter of high school seniors are reading below grade level.

But that flat performance wasn’t just among students who struggled with math and reading, officials said. It also extended to the highest-performing students.

The results released Wednesday also showed that the achievement gap between white students and their black and Hispanic counterparts remained stubbornly wide, despite more than a decade of federal efforts to close it.

Image: High school student, via Shutterstock

Add a Comment
Back To Parents News Now

Principal, Mom Agree: Child Should Not Be on Honor Roll

Friday, November 15th, 2013

A Florida principal is in agreement with the mother of a seventh-grader who was placed on the honor roll despite having a C and a D on his report card that the placement was misguided and should be reversed.  More from ABC News:

Principal Kim Anderson of Pasco Middle School in Dade City, Fla., was siding with Beth Tillack who was upset that her seventh grade son Douglas was on the honor roll and his report card came with a teacher’s comment, “good job” and a smiley face.

The principal said that 45 percent to 50 percent of the school’s students are on the honor roll. She said it was a “difficult situation” and that Beth Tillack was justified in questioning policies surrounding the school’s standards and system of assessment.

“I do agree with her,” said Anderson. “I feel it’s important for students to progress by meeting standards. We measure them by standards, they know if they’ve met them or not. Sometimes grades don’t always indicate that.”

The Pasco Middle School honor roll system is based on a weighted grade point averages, meaning that the 3.16 average Douglas Tillack achieved overall for his four A’s, a C and a D, just pushed him over the honors requirement line, which is set at 3.15.

Theoretically, children could get an F and still qualify for the honor roll, said Anderson, which is problematic when a child might not be motivated to perform like they should.

“Her son is a bright boy and can do the work. There are choices he’s making,” Anderson said. “He knows exactly what he can get away with. Maybe this is a wake-up call that there are higher expectations.”

Beth Tillack told ABC News affiliate WFTS that when she saw the report card and the honor roll notice, “I immediately assumed it’s a mistake. It was glaring in the fact that it said ‘good job’ and then there was a D.”

Tillack said that after her complaint, the school reissued the card, replacing “good job” with “Work on civics. Ask for help.”

“The bottom line is there’s nothing honorable about making a D,” said Tillack. “I was not happy, because how can I get my child to study for a test when he thinks he’s done enough?”

Image: Report card, via Shutterstock

Add a Comment
Back To Parents News Now