Posts Tagged ‘ product safety ’

Two Brands of Dressers Recalled; Three Toddlers Reportedly Killed

Thursday, January 31st, 2013

Three toddlers have reportedly died in accidents associated with their bedroom dressers tipping over, prompting the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to announce recalls of the two furniture brands responsible.  Natart Chelsea Dressers, made by the Canadian company Gemme Juvenile Inc., and the popular California brand Million Dollar Baby Dressers are the two companies issuing recalls and offering parents retrofits for drawers and tip-over restraints to attach the dressers to a wall.

Here’s more information on each recall, and what to do if you have either dresser:

Natart Chelsea Dressers from Gemme Juvenile, Inc.:

When the dresser drawers are pulled all the way out and then the additional weight of a young child is applied, the dresser’s center of gravity can be altered and result in instability of the product and consequently tip over. A child can become injured in the fall or suffocate under the weight of the fallen dresser.

This recall involves the Chelsea three-drawer windowed dresser bearing model number 3033. The dressers were sold in five finishes Cappuccino, Cappuccino with a brown top, Ebony, Ebony with a brown top, and Antique or French White. A sticker with the word “Natart” and the firm’s logo is affixed to the inside of the top drawer. In addition, most dressers will have the model number, “Natart Juvenile,” “Made in Canada” and “Chelsea 3 Drawer Dresser” printed on another label located on the back of the dresser. The recalled dresser measures 35-inches high by 21- inches deep by 39- inches wide and is part of the Chelsea children’s bedroom furniture collection. The dresser is composed of engineered wood, solid wood and wood veneers. The top drawer has two clear plastic windows in front.

The dressers were sold at Furniture Kidz and other independent juvenile specialty stores and at Baby.com from January 2005 to December 2010 for between $600 and $900.

Consumers should immediately stop using and place the dresser out of a child’s reach. Free retrofit kits that contain wall anchor straps are being offered to consumers to help prevent the dresser from tipping. The kits can be ordered by visiting www.chelseawallanchors.com, www.NatartJuvenile.com, emailing the firm at safety@chelseawallanchors.com or calling toll-free at (855) 364-2619 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday.

Million Dollar Baby Dressers by Bexco Enterprises, Inc.:

When a young child climbs up on open dresser drawers, the dresser becomes unstable and poses the risk of tip over and entrapment. CPSC and Million Dollar Baby have received two reports of deaths associated with these dressers. An 11-month-old boy from Tulsa, Okla. and a 20-month-old girl from Camarillo, Calif. were reported to have suffocated when their dressers tipped over, entrapping them between the dresser and the floor. The cause of the deaths has not been determined.

This voluntary recall involves “Emily” style four-drawer dressers with model numbers M4712, M4722, M4732 and M4742 and similar “Ryan” dressers with the model M4733. The dressers were sold in five finishes: Cherry, Ebony, Espresso, Honey Oak and White. The model number, “Million Dollar Baby” and “MADE IN TAIWAN” are printed on a label located on the back of the dresser. The recalled dresser measures 33-inches high by 20-inches deep by 40-inches wide and is a part of the DaVinci children’s bedroom furniture collection. The dressers are made from pine and wood composite.

The recalled dressers were sold at JCPenney and independent juvenile specialty stores nationwide and online at Amazon.com, BabiesRUs.com, BabyUniverse.com and other online retailers from January 2006 through June 2010 for between $230 and $300.

The Million Dollar Baby dressers met applicable voluntary standards when first produced, but a May 2009 voluntary industry standard, and subsequent revisions published in October 2009 and November 2009, requires that tip-over restraints be sold with the dressers. The restraints attach to a wall, framing or other support to help prevent dresser tip-over entrapment hazards to young children. Million Dollar Baby is offering free retrofit kits with tip-over restraints to consumers who have older dressers. Included in the kit is an adhesive warning label that consumers are to attach to the dresser, which describes how to prevent tip-over injuries.

Consumers should immediately stop using and keep the dresser out of a child’s reach. Consumers can contact Million Dollar Baby to receive a free retrofit kit that contains a wall anchor strap, which attaches to the dresser and wall to help prevent the dresser from tipping. The kits can be ordered by visiting the firm’s website at www.themdbfamily.com/safety2 and click on Safety HQ or call toll-free at (888) 673-6652 between 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. PT Monday through Friday.

 

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Trampolines Not Safe for Kids, Pediatricians Say

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

The American Academy of Pediatrics has updated a 1999 recommendation concerning trampolines, now warning children to stay away from them at home and at playgrounds.  Nearly 100,000 emergency room visits can be attributed each year to trampoline-related injuries, the group said, and new “safety features” on many trampolines can give families a false sense of security.  Reuters has more:

“As best we can tell, the addition of safety nets and padding has actually not changed the injuries we have seen,” said Dr. Susannah Briskin, a sports medicine specialist who helped draft the new statement.

It’s estimated that the number of trampoline injuries nationwide has been dropping – from 111,851 cases treated at ERs in 2004, to 97,908 in 2009. But that doesn’t necessarily mean the devices have become any less dangerous, Briskin told Reuters Health.

“Even though there has been a decrease in injuries,” she said, “I caution people against taking that too literally because the number of trampolines has also decreased.”

The actual risk of hurting yourself if you step onto a trampoline is not clear, Briskin added, because there are no good data on national exposure. The rate of hospitalization due to the injuries is about three percent.

Mark Publicover, founder and president of JumpSport Inc, a trampoline manufacturer in San Jose, California, scoffed at the AAP’s recommendations.

He said he invented a safety net that encircles the trampoline and cuts the number of injuries by half. And, he added, if parents ban trampolines, their children might start climbing trees, using swings or skateboards, for instance.

“If you look at all those activities, a safety-enclosed trampoline is safer by hours of use,” Publicover told Reuters Health. “When they say, ‘Don’t use trampolines with a safety enclosure,’ they are going to increase the number of injuries.”


Image: Kids on trampoline, via Shutterstock

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