Posts Tagged ‘ parent health ’

Kids Face PTSD Risk When Parents Are Injured

Thursday, June 5th, 2014

Children whose parents are seriously injured face an elevated risk of developing post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) even if they themselves were not injured, according to new research conducted in Seattle.  The new study is reportedly the first to examine the effect of parents’ injuries on children in settings other than war zones.  More from Reuters:

Researchers studied 175 pairs of parents and school-age children seen at a Seattle trauma center. They found that uninjured children whose parents were seriously hurt were twice as likely to experience PTSD symptoms months later as those whose parents were uninjured.

“If the parent is injured, the child is more likely to have more anxiety in five months,” psychiatrist Dr. Douglas Zatzick told Reuters Health. “We hope to incorporate psychological support services that allow us to anticipate the difficulties that families face in the wake of injury.”

Motor vehicle crashes were the primary cause of injury when both the parent and child were seriously hurt. Other injuries were caused by burns or falls, for instance.

About 20 percent of uninjured children whose parents were injured reported symptoms of PTSD five months later, compared to 10 percent of uninjured children whose parents were also unhurt, according to findings published in Pediatrics. The difference shrunk after a year.

Zatzick and his colleagues at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle also found that injured children tended to recover more slowly physically and emotionally if their parents were also injured than children whose parents were not seriously hurt.

Image: Woman in hospital bed, via Shutterstock

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Parents Eat More Saturated Fats, Study Finds

Monday, August 13th, 2012

A new study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has found that parents eat more foods containing saturated fats than people without children.  By making better food choices, researchers concluded, parents can not only prevent weight gain and health problems for themselves, but they can be better role models for their children.  CNN.com reports:

A diet high in saturated fat can lead to obesity, high cholesterol, heart attacks and Type 2 diabetes.

“Parents of younger children do tend to bring in more convenience foods into the home more often,” said Dr. Helena Laroche, the lead author on the study. “That may account for the difference in saturated fat intake.”

Laroche’s study appeared in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. It examined data collected in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults cohort study, which followed more than 2,000 young adults for 20 years.

Her research focused on the first seven years of a new parent’s life, comparing how often they ate and what they ate to the eating habits of people without children.

It asked people to document how much saturated fat was in their diet, how many fruits and vegetables they ate, how often they went out for fast food, and how much soda and juice they consumed.

Other than with saturated fat intake, parents’ diets were similar to those people without kids. “Ultimately, neither had the ideal diet at the end of seven years,” Laroche said.

Still, Laroche said, parents should know that what they choose to eat sends powerful messages to their children.

“The big takeaway from our study is that we really do want parents to be better role models for their children when it comes to healthy eating,” she said.

Image: Strawberry ice cream cone, via Shutterstock.

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