Posts Tagged ‘ literacy ’

How a Text Message Could Help Make Your Child Smarter

Wednesday, November 19th, 2014

Text Messaging Could Help Improve Language Skills for PreschoolersHelping build your preschooler’s language skills may be just a text message away, new research suggests.

According to a study conducted by Stanford University researchers in local San Francisco preschools, a text messaging program targeted at parents of preschoolers helped to significantly increase the number of in-home literacy-based activities like “telling stories, going over words that rhyme, or completing puzzles together,” a news release states. Even better, these activities, in turn, led to higher scores on literacy-based tests among the children.

Researchers with the Stanford Graduate School of Education created the program, called READY4K! The program periodically sent text messages to parents offering tips on how they could engage with their child to develop early literacy skills.

Sample text messages included reminders like: “Say two words to your child that start with the same sound, like happy & healthy.”

A news release states:

Three texts were sent each week throughout the school year to the participating parents of four-year-olds. On Mondays, parents received a general fact about the benefits of a certain literacy skill. On Wednesdays, parents got a specific tip on something they could do to work with their child on building that skill. On Fridays, parents received ideas on how they can take it a step further.

“I believe that all families want to be involved in their child’s learning, but many feel they don’t have the time or perceive that supporting their child’s learning might be labor intensive or something that the teacher is better at,” Meenoo Yashar, Executive Director of Program Quality & Enhancement at the San Francisco Unified School District, said in the news release.

“The texting program offered some simple nuggets around literacy strategies and validated that families do want to be involved, if given information that is easy to receive and useful.”

It’s never too early to encourage reading and writing skills for your little one. Read about more ways you can help foster your child’s interest in learning here.

Why Preschool Matters
Why Preschool Matters
Why Preschool Matters

Photo of dad and son courtesy of Shutterstock.

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U.S. Kids Spend Less Time on Pleasure Reading

Tuesday, May 13th, 2014

American children still read for pleasure, according to a new report, but not very often and not very well.  Reuters has more:

The San Francisco-based nonprofit Common Sense Media, which focuses on the effects of media and technology on children, published the report, which brings together information from several national studies and databases.

“It raises an alarm,” said Vicky Rideout, the lead author of the report. “We’re witnessing a really large drop in reading among teenagers and the pace of that drop is getting faster and faster.”

The report found that the percentage of nine-year-old children reading for pleasure once or more per week had dropped from 81 percent in 1984 to 76 percent in 2013, based on government studies. There were even larger decreases among older children.

A large portion rarely read for pleasure. About a third of 13-year-olds and almost half of 17-year-olds reported in one study that they read for pleasure less than twice a year.

Of those who read or are read to, children tend to spend on average between 30 minutes and an hour daily with that activity, the report found. Older children and teenagers tend to read for pleasure for an equally long time each day.

Rideout cautioned that there may be difference in how people encounter text and the included studies may not take into account stories read online or on social media.

The report also found that many young children are struggling with literacy. Only about one-third of fourth grade students are “proficient” in reading and another one-third scored below “basic” reading skills.

Despite the large percentage of children with below-basic reading skills, reading scores among young children have improved since the 1970s, according to one test that measures reading ability.

The reading scores among 17-year-olds, however, remained relatively unchanged since the 1970s.

About 46 percent of white children are considered “proficient” in reading, compared with 18 percent of black children and 20 percent of Hispanic kids.

Those gaps remained relatively unchanged over the past 20 years, according to the report.

“To go 20 years with no progress in that area is shameful,” Rideout said.

Help make reading fun with this free “Animal Antics” reading worksheet!

The Lasting Impact of the Early Childhood Years
The Lasting Impact of the Early Childhood Years
The Lasting Impact of the Early Childhood Years

Image: Girl reading, via Shutterstock

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Parental Involvement with Young Kids May Help Later Academic Performance

Wednesday, January 29th, 2014

Parents who are involved in active play with their children during their toddler and preschool years may have better academic performance to look forward to, according to new research by scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  The findings come from a study of African American boys who were transitioning from preschool to kindergarten.

“The transition to kindergarten can be challenging for many children due to new expectations, social interactions, and physiological changes,” said Iheoma Iruka, the study’s lead author, in a statement. “Transitions may be even more arduous for African American boys, given the many challenges they are likely to face compared to their peers.”

Iruka found four patterns for African American boys after they transitioned—and her team also demonstrated the key role that parenting plays in these outcomes.

Just over half the boys (51%) showed increases in language, reading, and math scores in kindergarten, but a sizeable group (19%) consisted of low achievers in preschool who declined even further academically after transition. The smallest group (11%) included early achievers who declined in kindergarten both academically and behaviorally; by contrast, 20% of the boys in the study comprised a group of early achievers who remained on their high-performing academic and social paths after the transition.

According to Iruka, the results clearly suggest that some African American boys experience challenges to their academic achievement and social skills as they move into to kindergarten.

“In addition, the two groups of early achievers is especially revealing about the importance of effective parenting,” she said. “African American boys from homes where mothers frequently engaged in literacy activities and intentional teaching—and other activities like playing games and taking the child on errands—were likely to be in the high achieving groups.”

Iruka’s study also showed that parent-child interactions influence whether a high-achieving  African American boy stays on course.

“It’s important to note that the early achievers who declined academically and socially were more likely to be from homes in which the parents were inattentive,” she said. “The group of boys with detached parents showed a significant decrease in their reading and math scores and an increase in aggression during the preschool-to-kindergarten transition.”

Want to know what career your child might have? Take our quiz to find out!

Back to School: Advice for Every Grade
Back to School: Advice for Every Grade
Back to School: Advice for Every Grade

Image: African American boy, via Shutterstock

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